The Greatest Game


Fiction - Visionary
199 Pages
Reviewed on 05/18/2021
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

The Greatest Game by Greg Rajaram is a light read that I would consider as one of the most philosophical works of fiction I have ever read. While Sophie’s World is too didactic for my taste, The Greatest Game is simply impressive in its uniqueness. It is very readable, but it makes you stop in the middle of reading to think before recommencing. In this novella, we have a ten-year-old boy named Adi, who works with two philosophers named Rudhra and Matsya as they look into the prophecy of a promised king and encounter philosophical questions cloaked in analogies. And then there is Krish, whose mother Maya had inculcated in him that there is no sin in love, and makes him promise to always uphold love’s virtues. Krish stays true to his promise into his adult years. As an engineer, the topic of building artificial intelligence that mimics human consciousness is of huge interest to him. In the process, he will learn about truth in relation to consciousness, and he will face a great fight that will test what he has learned about love.

Greg Rajaram has used many concepts in this novella and invites you to read this work with an open and unbiased mind. Adi and Krish’s story is filled with parables and analogies. Like many stories that dabble in the philosophical, The Greatest Game works by presenting universal truths without being biased. Rajaram promotes love as a potent force that can provide the balance that you seek in your existence. At a time when we are tested and are seeking new ideas, love can perhaps aid us in our quest for the transcendence that can sometimes prove elusive. As for pacing, the main plot is not immediately revealed as the beginning of the story goes into some associative subplots that will only make sense to you when you reach the middle of the book. Nonetheless, The Greatest Game does not appear static as it hinges on Rajaram’s writing tone, mood, and energy. It is a good book to read especially if you are a truth-seeking soul at heart.