Fate & Freedom - Book II

The Turning Tides

Fiction - Historical - Event/Era
282 Pages
Reviewed on 06/04/2017
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Jane Finch for Readers' Favorite

Fate and Freedom – Book II: The Turning Tides by K.I. Knight tells the continuing story of two African children, Margaret and John, as they grow into young people, having gone in different directions. Margaret goes to Jamestown, the first settlement in Virginia in the New World and settles into a life of servanthood, yet enjoys considerable respect and a certain amount of freedom. John accompanies Captain Jope into privateering on the high seas and learns all about life aboard ship, eventually earning the respect of the crew. Although worlds apart, the two never forgot each other until their dreams and their roles in life finally lead them back together. Intertwined with historical accuracy is the battle for power in England and the struggles in Virginia in this story of pioneering hardship and survival.

Knight has done an excellent job of weaving a story full of intrigue and adventure, yet also conveying an accurate historical account of life in the 17th century, both in England with its power struggles amongst the monarchy and those in Jamestown merely trying to survive and start the first new colony of settlers. The lengths to which the author has gone to ensure accuracy and to give credibility to the historical account with evident intensive research is a credit. The characters are believable and well developed and the storyline compelling and emotional. This book follows on from Book I: The Middle Passage, but works well as a standalone book in its own right. An excellent piece of writing from a clearly accomplished author.