Frickin Short Life

The World's Smallest Autobiography

Non-Fiction - Memoir
406 Pages
Reviewed on 06/28/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

Frickin Short Life: The World's Smallest Autobiography by Khawar Salim is what the title says it is, and I suggest that it should be one of the nonfiction works that you read this year. Frickin Short Life is comprised of 268 profound meditations on the little yet reflective events that happened in the author’s life. These are reflections of strong awareness and appreciation for the joy of being alive after Salim’s bout with a brutal stroke that rendered him immobile and expressionless. Frickin Short Life can be read in two ways: First, you can read each chapter as a quote to ponder for the day, with their simple truths reverberating in your heart. Second, you can read and see this autobiography as a collection of platitudes that anyone can come up with and similarly conclude that you have read better quotes from the classic sages and philosophers.

Whichever way you choose to read it, you have learned something. Your common sense will dictate that there is no attempt at pretentiousness in Salim’s terse musings. There are no hard words. On the whole, this autobiography doesn’t attempt to chronicle his entire existence, but rather merely highlights those humbling snippets that appear to matter more to him. The reading experience here is refreshing and kind enough to remind you of the value of being appreciative of the little things that give huge joy. Salim doesn’t take any umbrage even when life has dealt him a hard blow. He talks of the excitement of chewing candy, of tying his dreams with strong silk threads, and of discovering death as it hovers above his head. These are just some of his ponderables. There is so much more I could put here as every page of Frickin Short Life sparks a revelation about a grateful man. But it would be much better if you pick a copy for yourself.