Girl of Glass


Young Adult - Paranormal
242 Pages
Reviewed on 03/14/2018
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Author Biography

Megan O'Russell is the author of How I Magically Messed Up My Life in Four Freakin' Days and The Girl Without Magic (both with Curiosity Quills Press) as well as the YA Dystopian Girl of Glass and the Christmas romance Nuttycracker Sweet, both published with Fiery Seas Publishing. 2018 projects include Boy of Blood, the second book in the Girl of Glass trilogy (Fiery Seas Publishing).



In addition to writing, Megan travels the country as a professional musical theatre performer alongside her husband, moving from show to show and stage to stage. She recently had the opportunity to add “lyricist” to her bag of tricks with Second Chances: The Thrift Shop Musical.

When not wearing tap shoes or writing new stories and songs, Megan can usually be found up a mountain. Sometimes in Alaska, sometimes Space Mountain. Either way, adventure all around.

Megan is represented by Lane Heymont at the Tobias Literary Agency.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Robin Goodfellow for Readers' Favorite

Girl of Glass by Megan O’Russell is a young adult dystopian novel about what it means to be human. Magnolia “Nola” Kent is a young woman who has lived in the Dome her entire life. When a riot on Charity Day gets out of hand, she meets an old flame named Kieran, who asks her for medication to save someone else’s life. As time goes on, she begins to realize just how different the world is, and desperately seeks help for the people outside. Before she knows it, she’s thrust into a world filled with drugs, poverty, and desperation. In this thrilling novel, Russell explores an apocalyptic world through the eyes of a girl who must find a way to bridge the gap between humans and monsters, all the while moving on from an uncertain life that knows nothing of sorrow.

Personally, when I read about Jeremy, Kieran, and Nola, I thought it would be just another teenage love triangle that would go about resolving itself in an overly-dramatic way. I was happy to see that this was not the case. All three care about the future and humanity, and all three have their own way of going about it. Kieran would support the vampires in trying to find a way that humans can survive on the outside; Jeremy would take charge within the Dome through the Outer Guard; and Nola would be the bridge that connected the Dome and the outside world. Despite that, the reality of an apocalyptic nightmare shattered their expectations. Desperation and poverty run rampant, and it was only through the three sides that they were able to even begin to grasp just how dire things are. In some cases, I found the vampires even more humane than the very humans that have trapped themselves inside their ivory towers. Honestly, Charity Day was rather a brutal concept, taking pity on the suffering citizens on the outside while they enjoyed their luxurious lives from within. It’s a story rife with drama and politics, and one that I believe every reader will enjoy.