Moon Beam


Fiction - Science Fiction
242 Pages
Reviewed on 05/05/2018
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Ray Simmons for Readers' Favorite

I have been a huge fan of stories that take place on the moon since I picked up a book called The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, back in middle school. I have been looking for great stories that take place on the moon since then and today I read one. Moon Beam by Steven Burgauer is great moon-based science fiction. In its own way it is as gripping, but since the tension and excitement is work related instead of political, Steven Burgauer probably won’t be getting a Hugo like Heinlein. Moon Beam is a great story and the writing is a good match for the genre. This is the kind of near future science fiction that needs to be written if we are going to inspire our kids to once again look to the final frontier.

Moon Beam is the kind of book and story that could help us find that drive to explore once again. It shows life on the moon in no-nonsense realistic terms, and yet, this life on the frontier looks appealing, if a little dangerous. The characters in Moon Beam are not super hero types. They are scientists doing jobs that only scientists can do. The plot is excellent. Human beings have always been the greatest danger to human beings. I love Chief Clay Flynn and his senior tech, Lou Santini. They are two no-nonsense engineer types that solve problems with their heads, but are also capable of being physical when needed. But it is the setting that most impressed me about Moon Beam. Steven Burgauer writes this exciting, near future science fiction story very well. I am very glad I read it.

Maureen Dangarembizi

Moon Beam by Steven Burgauer is a futuristic sci-fi novel set on a human occupied moon base. Life on the moon is not easy and mostly downright dangerous. When an explosion rocks the moon base, Chief Engineer Clay Flynn and his friend, Senior Tech Lou Santini, must race to find the culprit and stop an even bigger catastrophe before it's too late. The moon base has come a long way in technological advancement, the Moon Beam being the best yet, but it still relies heavily on Earth for many resources, not to mention the delicate balance that keeps everyone alive. The saboteur knows this too. Clay Flynn is forced to admit that he doesn't really know the woman he's been sharing a bed with.

Moon Beam is a very technical story. Steven Burgauer goes deep into the scientific theory that makes space travel possible. For those interested in the physics and chemistry side of space travel, this book is a treasure trove of information. I really felt like the characters were real scientists. The scientific research that went into this story is evident in every situation. I could taste the moon dust. Though the characters are super smart, they are very human and easy to relate to. Their needs and actions touch on the fundamental core of humanity. The antagonist, who is not an alien, had a real grievance that I felt was pivotal to the theme of the story. Technology has advanced, but isn't enough to solve some of humankind's problems. I really enjoyed Moon Beam. This would make a great movie.

Christian Sia

Moon Beam by Steven Burgauer is a great blend of fantasy and science fiction with a setting in a lunar station. Readers are introduced to a ruthless female killer, a character who feeds on fear. Now she is about to send shock waves across the globe at a time of great achievement with a piece of technology that could revolutionize Lunar Station, and if she isn’t stopped in time, the consequences could be devastating for everyone. Follow Chief Clay Flynn and Senior Tech Lou Santini on a race to stop her, but do they have what it takes to save their world from catastrophe? The life of Lunar Station depends on their success.

The narrative opens with a powerful image: “The woman sat, half-naked, shivering in the cold, sterile air of the lunar habitat.” The hands of the woman are resting on her automatic gun, about to end her life, and this isn’t the first time she’s tried. This kind of opening announces the sense of urgency that will permeate the entire narrative. Steven Burgauer creates a setting in a way that readers will feel as though they were dreaming about it — at least, that was the feeling I had when I turned the last page — and he succeeds in keeping readers riveted through every page. The prose is elegant and I enjoyed the unique turn of phrase. The characters are awesome and I loved how the author explores human emotions in the narrative. Moon Beam is a gripping story with a strong conflict, fast-paced and compelling.