A Newfound Land

The Graham Saga Book 4

Fiction - Time Travel
402 Pages
Reviewed on 02/09/2020
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Jamie Michele for Readers' Favorite

A Newfound Land by Anna Belfrage is the fourth book in the time travel series The Graham Saga, which is preceded by book one, A Rip in the Veil, book two, Like Chaff in the Wind, and book three, The Prodigal Son. Time traveler Matthew Graham, his wife Alex, and their family have established themselves, building a home and a life over the course of four years on their own plot of rural land in the Maryland colony in 1672. The Grahams believe they have finally found a place and time they can truly call home, until individuals they'd thought they'd left behind for good begin to pop up in their sphere. Matthew again is in a fight for his life and the protection of his family, as the people of the Maryland colony struggle with the decades-old peace treaty with the Susquehannock Indians—with some bent on profiting off them in the cruelest possible way.

A Newfound Land is absolutely rich in historical detail, which Anna Belfrage administers beautifully, weaving it into the story and descriptions without overpowering a reader with dense and superfluous facts. I admit this is the first book I've read in the series, and while it worked perfectly well as a stand-alone, I'm intrigued to go back and start from the beginning. Alongside the tension of Matthew's struggles—which snowball with fantastic abandon—are moments of everyday life and the ordinary minutiae that make historical fiction so pleasurable to read. Belfrage is able to assert some moments of irony as well, such as when a colonist says of a native American woman, “God knows what plagues she brings with her...”

No doubt this book will be compared to another series about a time-traveling woman, but that would do The Graham Saga a terrible disservice as, having read all of those and only one of this series, I can already tell which is superior in both its literary merit and its ability to keep the reader engrossed in the time period. Lucky for us, books five through nine have already been released, making this series a very highly recommended 2020 binge.

K.C. Finn

A Newfound Land is a work of time travel fiction with plenty of history and intrigue and was penned by author Anna Belfrage. Written as the fourth novel in The Graham Saga, the book is suitable for adult readers due to explicit sexual situations and violence. Matthew Graham and his wife Alexandra, who has the incredible gift of time travel well and truly under her belt, decide to make a move from Scotland due to the religious conflicts happening there during the late 17th century. Settling in the Colony of Maryland holds promise, but once there, the family realizes that every place has its own conflicts and troubles to be sorted out.

Author Anna Belfrage takes a strong family with excellent personalities and allows us to follow them through realistic struggles in everyday life. Although there is a little time travel conceptual stuff going on for the sake of the plot, the real center of the tale is a solid historical one, with fantastic detailing and plenty of authentic atmosphere laid down by the author. You can practically smell the wilderness of Maryland as you open the pages, inhaling the harsh air and hearing the cries of the Susquehannock people. I liked the drama and the characters surrounding the central pair very much, and as an addition to a continuing series, fans will find much to delight in how old meets new. Overall, A Newfound Land is a high-quality tale with accurate history and characters to fall for over and over again.

Rabia Tanveer

A Newfound Land is the fourth book in The Graham Saga by Anna Belfrage. This is a heart-racing time travel story with plenty of action, romance and incredible characters that will have you wanting more. It is the year 1672 and Alex and Matthew are having a hard time living in Scotland with all the political and religious turmoil that has taken over their country. They decided to pack up their bags and relocate to the Colony of Maryland. They thought to find peace there but they were wrong. Some foes of the past come back into their lives and some new enemies are making their lives hell. But things take a turn for the worse when Matthew saves some women from the Burley brothers and they won’t let it go. They have Matthew pegged as the enemy and they will do everything in their power to end his existence. Now Matthew and Alex have to find a way to keep out of danger. Can they do that?

I was blown away with the detailed descriptions in A Newfound Land. I could easily picture the scenes, hear the sounds and feel it all like I was watching a movie. I could easily imagine what Matthew and Alex would sound like, what their expressions were like and how they would react in certain situations. I enjoyed how Anna Belfrage told a story and made it into this exciting sensory experience with just her words. The pace was perfect, the narrative was incredibly smooth and the story flowed incredibly well. I enjoyed the addition of the Burley brothers; they added action and a little drama to the story to keep me invested. The whole political and religious background of the story made it more complex and gave me something more to look forward to. I enjoyed this more than I thought I would.