Plague of Angels

Plague of Angels

The Descended Book 1

Fiction - Paranormal
360 Pages
Reviewed on 04/12/2016
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Sarah Stuart for Readers' Favorite

Plague of Angels (The Descended Book 1) by John Patrick Kennedy uses facts taken from the New Testament of the Christian Holy Bible. However, it is a fantasy so time is measured in eons not a mere two thousand years. Nyx, a fallen angel, was banished to Hell, where she fought for supremacy to become its queen. Later, trapped on Earth, she falls in love with the disillusioned Son of God; “Father, why have You forsaken me” expresses his feelings. For Him, Nyx initiates a thousand-year reign of terror; she uses sex, violence and betrayal to force mankind to worship her. He has promised her a paradise on Earth if she succeeds, but her lover has plans even she, with all her magical powers, fails to foresee.

Irreverent and blasphemous are the words that came to mind while reading the prologue of Plague of Angels (The Descended Book 1) by John Patrick Kennedy, followed by dramatic, powerful, and, when I caught my breath at the end of chapter one enough to think, it would make a marvelous movie. God’s son resisting temptation in the desert is incredible; the crucifixion scene surpasses it, and anything recorded in the Bible. This is what the human eye is incapable of seeing; the ascent of His spirit to heaven, set against darkness and storm as the elemental forces of nature are controlled by the Almighty. Prepare to be shocked to the core, Christian or not. Plague of Angels is the most gripping paranormal fantasy I have ever read.

Janelle Fila

Plague of Angels (The Descended Book 1) by John Patrick Kennedy is a paranormal story for adults about angels and a re-imagined God. Nyx is the Queen of Hell. When she meets the son of God, she’s surprised to learn that he feels tricked into sacrificing himself for mankind, because he doesn’t believe in their redemption. They strike up an unusual partnership. Nyx is promised the most beautiful paradise if she helps completely destroy humanity. And so begins a reign of dark, bloody, deadly terror. No one is spared Nyx’s destruction as she seeks to annihilate all of God’s worshippers, big or small. But the son of God has a secret. What Nyx doesn’t know is that their pact isn’t as straightforward as it appears. The son of God has something up his sleeve that will shock them all in this first book of the series.

Plague of Angels is one of those books you are either going to love or hate. The writing is good. John Patrick Kennedy definitely has a talent for stringing words together to give us crafty sentences and beautiful scenes. The setting is gorgeous and the concept of this book is unique and very interesting. But this story is very dark and will not appeal to all readers. There is a lot of excessive sex, torture, and violence. Most of it is described in graphic detail and leaves little to be imagined (which is another testament to Kennedy’s writing abilities). If you can stomach the gore, you will be rewarded with a very interesting read.

Faridah Nassozi

Plague of Angels (The Descended Book 1) by John Patrick Kennedy is the story of the apparently disgruntled Son of God (Tribunal) sent to earth to judge humanity and the dark temptress (Nyx) is sent to test his will. All the other angels had been recalled, leaving Nyx alone on earth with just the mortal beings for company. Then she was informed that God was sending his own son to earth and she was to tempt him as a way of testing his will. So what happens when the one angel that defied God falls in love with his only son? Nyx was not ready for the emotions she felt towards Tribunal, but she gave in to them and together they crafted a master plan to defeat God by turning humans away from him. After Tribunal is crucified and returns to heaven, Nyx has the next 1000 years to enforce the plan, at the end of which she would regain her control over hell and also have earth to do with as she wishes. Eager to enforce her part of the plan, Nyx rejoices in the chaos and devastation she is causing, thinking that all is going according to plan, but she does not know Tribunal's true intentions and real plans.

Plague of Angels (The Descended Book 1) by John Patrick Kennedy is the story of Jesus like it has never been told before. There are countless twists to the original story, making it a one of a kind read. John Patrick Kennedy does not try to copy the facts of the original story or even recreate it; he completely owns his version of events by simply using the original story as a background against which to set his unique and compelling tale. Another plus to his version is the language. The fact that the dialogue is in modern day language alone adds to the measure of his skills. Ideally, to tell such a historical tale in contemporary language would be a no-no, but John Patrick Kennedy pulls it off perfectly and in such a way that the contrast just adds more oomph to the story; like an elusive dance between two time periods. The setting and scenes are raw and the detail with which he describes them makes it a very visual read that has them vividly coming to life.