The Origin of F.O.R.C.E.


Fiction - Science Fiction
461 Pages
Reviewed on 07/17/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Rabia Tanveer for Readers' Favorite

The Origin of F.O.R.C.E. is the first book in a series by Sam B Miller II. When a small group of humans shoots down an alien spaceship, they realize two things: this is not the last time they will see the aliens, and the aliens will be back to wipe humans out with their superior technology. Unbeknownst to the humans, an alien named WrrNrr Zennk survived the crash and was captured by Major James Blunt. Luckily for Earth, the alien planet is light years away, which gives the humans plenty of time to prepare for the attack and protect Earth. Even luckier for Earth is the fact that WrrNrr can help them prepare. But how will humans fight off an invasion from an alien species that is far more technologically advanced and intelligent? Is there a way to evade them? Or Earth is doomed?

I was hooked from the moment I picked this book up. I took my time; I savored each sentence to get the full experience. The Origin of F.O.R.C.E. is intense and packed with action from the very beginning. I was interested in WrrNrr and wanted to know more about him, but the narrative made him appear far out of my reach. James Blunt (aptly named) is a shrewd, go-getter who does not wait for other people to take the lead. He and Diane work together incredibly well and are a fascinating team. You can tell Sam B Miller II did a lot of research before writing this story. The fact that I wasn’t confused by the genetic modification of humans says how clear the author was in their research. Author Sam B Miller II explores the characters and gives readers a first-hand look into the lives and minds of the characters who work closely with this alien invasion evasion mission. The pace is fast, the narrative is interesting, and the action just never stops. I loved this book!

Vincent Dublado

His name is Whatsit, son of DrrTrr Zennk, captain of the exploratory scout saucer, UurBereck. His own kind thought he was dead, but what they didn’t know is that he survived. The shooting down of the Chrysallaman saucer prompted the creation of the Federal Organization for Response to Celestial Enemies. The Origin of F.O.R.C.E. by Sam B. Miller II is a science-fiction tale that gives you a hypothetical look at military preparation for an impending alien invasion. Whatsit has been in military custody. Like his fellow lizard-like Chrysallamans, he possesses highly developed mental powers. Sheltered and assimilated into the military, he becomes a part of the plan for Earth’s general defense. But to fight a technologically superior alien race that is determined to conquer and enslave, F.O.R.C.E. must also recruit a new breed of soldiers to work with Whatsit to have any chance of defeating the Chrysallamans.

Whatsit’s life is a lonely one. When you are separated from your own kind and are raised to be used for military defense, there is no doubt that the feeling of alienation will creep into your system. You use your superior mental abilities as leverage to resist—at least in the beginning. Sam B. Miller writes with satisfying details, sometimes in excess, to ensure that he doesn’t give you cardboard-type heroes, and he deserves credit for the effort. He shows us how Whatsit manages to adjust to his sheltered upbringing and fights his fellow Chrysallamans in a manner that demonstrates he has outgrown the fact that he is one of them. This idea requires accepting it with a little faith, but it is not that hard to swallow on account of the US military’s superb indoctrination skills. Whatsit is a lizard man, but he is likable. The Origin of F.O.R.C.E. is fun to read as it revels in its implausibility.

Steven Robson

The Origin of F.O.R.C.E. by Sam B. Miller II takes some very real history and weaves it into a possible future foreign to our sensibilities; a kind of parallel Universe where the human race faces a dire threat no one may survive. The peril that impinges on our future originates from 1947 when an enormous amount of conjecture surrounding the Roswell incident became indelibly etched into our collective minds. This event confirmed for many believers that we are not alone in the Universe. The possibility of an alien spaceship crashing and being concealed by the government lives with all of us now, and no matter what is said or done about it, there will always be an unknown question hanging over our heads; if this really did happen, will they come back?

Sam B. Miller II has created, in The Origin of F.O.R.C.E., a truly entertaining adventure through not just time, but also possible scientific developments and milestones that actually transpired. There were pieces of information provided throughout that I found fascinating, not the least of which is the speed we are traveling around the sun; I doubt anyone consciously considers we are moving at 30 kilometers per second. Added to these gems are the interesting characters, diverse relationships, and nicely perceived plot; players like Whatsit, the alien with a love for westerns, or McPherson, the ideal counterpoint for the pompous Dr. Heinbaum. This is science fiction with something for everyone, from the technology through to the action and danger on a massive scale, and you will want to know what happens after the last word is read.