Your Toolbox


Non-Fiction - Self Help
17 Pages
Reviewed on 07/22/2019
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Sarah Stuart for Readers' Favorite

Margie Harch opens Your Toolbox by introducing herself. Surprisingly, it was her father she began by regretting had not had access to such a resource. He had been physically abused as a boy, to the extent that he learned to box for self-protection. Further, Margie shares that she adopted a girl from a series of foster homes. Margie now needed a toolbox of her own to cope, so she developed one and wrote about how it can work for everyone who needs it. Your Toolbox is written in seven phases, or sections, that range from “Where Am I”, which asks you to be honest about your present situation and how it is affecting your life, to “Dump Your Bad Tools” – the aim for everyone using Your Toolbox.

Your Toolbox is a very practical book but following through the seven phases would take courage. Margie Harch makes this easier in several ways. Introducing herself as a friend and listing her own discoveries (tools), using examples, suggesting sharing your success, and three vivid illustrations. The examples of bad tools, which result in anger, self-loathing, and sadness, included several I wouldn’t have thought of like “believing you are entitled to get what you want” and “lying to yourself”. The last two illustrations sum up Margie’s ideas. One is green with a black lid, dumping bad tools, and the other red and cheerful. She even provides an email address, and who could ask for more? Your ToolBox by Margie Harch is a 5-star book worth reading.