A Hell For All Seasons


Fiction - Paranormal
232 Pages
Reviewed on 10/10/2017
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (Goodreads, B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

Author Biography

Emiliya Ahmadova was born in the city of Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan.
When she was just nine years old, she developed a passion for reading, literature, poetry, and foreign languages. In high school, she participated in and won many poetry competitions. Starting at the age of ten, she began writing poems and short stories in Russian.

Emiliya has diplomas in business management as well as a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in human resources management. She also has international diplomas in the advanced study of the theory and practice of management, administration, business management, communication, hotel operations management, office management and administration, and professional English from the Cambridge International College, in addition to a certificate in novel writing. Emiliya speaks four languages (Azeri, Russian, English, and some Turkish), but her native language is Azeri.
Because of her love for humanity and children, she has started volunteering in a local school and in 2011 became a Cub Scout leader and won a trophy as the first female parent leader. Emiliya likes being around people, adores travel, enjoys playing soccer, and relishes in helping other people.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Robin Goodfellow for Readers' Favorite

A Hell For All Seasons by Emiliya Ahmadova is a collection of horrific tales about the people who managed to escape damnation. From accidentally bartering your soul to a demon, to breaking up marriages if only for the sake of your vanity, to even being bullied in class, these short stories are rife with meticulous detail and imagery. There is a frightening satisfaction in reading these stories; a majority of the characters endeavor to clean up their sins, either through a simple prayer or running from the ghost chasing them. Ahmadova intertwines frightening monsters with a simple, yet complex narrative that reminds readers of the morals humanity tends to leave behind and, eventually, forget.

While I enjoyed the stories in this collection, one that resonated with me the most was Revenge, a story about a young girl who was bullied at school because her mother had, albeit unknowingly, embarrassed her. The way Katrina handled the predicament was wonderful, so very reminiscent of Stephen King’s Carrie, alongside the many articles of what happens when prey is cornered. Personally, I wanted Lisa and those other kids to suffer, but alas, Katrina is kinder than I am. Repetitive themes of damnation and redemption are also found throughout these stories, which help cultivate a sort of religious feel to them. Each character faced some sort of vice, with the stories an embodiment of the seven deadly sins. While the theme of damnation could be a bit repetitive at times, it was still incredibly well done. I would thus recommend this book to those who enjoyed Raven’s Peak by Lincoln Cole and Fallen Men by Brian O’ Hare.