A Homecoming to Forget


Young Adult - Mystery
267 Pages
Reviewed on 03/25/2020
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Paula García Lasa for Readers' Favorite

A Homecoming to Forget by Emily Camp starts when Sawyer Montgomery wakes up, only to find herself in the hospital surrounded by many worried faces, some of which she didn't even recognize. With her last memory being the freshman homecoming, she is surprised to find out that much time has passed since then. To her surprise, her life is nothing like it used to be: her father is married, she now has an older step-brother, and her lifelong best friend now hates her. If having to live with a three-year gap wasn't enough, she has this continual feeling of being in danger. She needs to remember what happened as soon as possible or it could be too late. However, when everything in your life has turned upside down, who can you trust?

I would be lying if I said that A Homecoming to Forget by Emily Camp didn't have me on the edge of my seat. It has been a long time since a book had me so tensed up and internally screaming the whole time. Given that you know as little as the main character, you don't know which character you can trust. It perfectly shows how things can take a 180 turn in only three years to the point of being a completely different person. It also ventures into the dilemma of what people do when they can hide the things they wish you never knew. The story is very well structured, and the alternation between the present and flashbacks is just perfect. Regarding the medical aspect (as far as my knowledge goes on this matter) the gradual recovery of her memory is done accurately. As for the characters, they are all as flawed and complex as they should be. A Homecoming to Forget was highly absorbing and I finished in only a few hours. If you are looking for a quick and addictive page-turner, this thriller is the book for you.