Corporate Crap

Lessons Learned from 40 Years in Corporate America

Non-Fiction - Business/Finance
122 Pages
Reviewed on 07/29/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Christian Sia for Readers' Favorite

Corporate Crap: Lessons Learned from 40 Years in Corporate America by Howard Harrison is as eye-opening as it is entertaining. In a tone that is humorous and conversational, the author explores corporate practices that lead to a lack of engagement in employees, making employees look elsewhere for employment. The author shows readers how employers treat their employees as though they are not the most valuable assets in the company. It is one of the few books that explores workplace issues with intelligence and surprising detail, looking at those practices that drain the energy from employees and commenting on a culture that does not uplift employees. Readers will understand why many organizations struggle with attrition, why they have to deal with employee burnouts, and a lot more.

Weaving his personal experiences into the book, the author discusses very important points on how management can be overbearing and the effect it has on employees. This book is well-researched and the author explores very sensitive areas, including activities that literally demean employees like dress codes, engagement surveys, flip charts, performance reviews, and a lot more. Readers will understand that 700 million vacation days were not used last year and why, and learn the common expressions that reflect corporate crap and lack of inclusive dialogue between the employers and the employees. Anyone who has worked in a corporate world will find themselves nodding in approval and appreciation, laughing at the tone and hilarity of the things the author exposes and wondering how dumber things can get when it comes to corporate crap. Corporate Crap: Lessons Learned from 40 Years in Corporate America is the first book I have read that brilliantly calls out large companies for the crap they impose on employees. The witticism in Howard Harrison’s writing and his ability to communicate in crisp prose and a tone that is upbeat and engaging are some of the elements that provide an exciting reading experience.