Creativity

The Magic Formula

Non-Fiction - Self Help
184 Pages
Reviewed on 06/07/2018
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Justine Reyes for Readers' Favorite

Creativity: The Magic Formula by Adam C. Wilber is a manual and a self-help book of sorts, at least for those needing inspiration or a way to dig themselves out of creative purgatory, like writer’s block. Wilber is an inventor, keynote speaker, and magician. He goes into depth about the latter and how magic (in the form of magic tricks) sparked his curiosity and influenced his creative cognition. Creativity is split into two parts; the first part is a bit of a short memoir and the second part is filled with steps to garner a creative process. Wilber also interviews other creators to help give useful insight into their creative process. Of course, Creativity is more than that; it reminds us all to appreciate the little things in life and enjoy them.

“What we capture and communicate to the rest of the world is what defines us.” This is one of my many favorite lines from this book, and a lot of what Wilber says and refers to when it comes to being a creative person is nothing short of the truth. Many first time authors, whether they’re looking into traditional publication or self-publication, will resonate with past feelings of self-doubt and fear of not being good enough. Wilber highlights this and gives not hope, but realism to such things. “If you don’t believe it, then it will never be your reality.” Creativity is insightful, witty, and absolutely helpful, especially if you often get creative blocks. I implore writers, artists, photographers, and anyone who considers themselves to be a creative soul to read this marvelous book.