Earth-Sim


Fiction - Science Fiction
260 Pages
Reviewed on 09/02/2015
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Janelle Fila for Readers' Favorite

Earth-Sim by Jade Kerrion takes a completely different look at the history of Earth and the history of mankind. What if Earth and the entire universe were actually part of a simulation program? What if the most iconic and memorable events in Earth's history were decisions (or more frequently accidents) triggered by two college students, Jem Moran and Kir Davos, who are still sorting out the finer points of working together and, more importantly, still arguing over the finer points of planetary management?

I really liked the premise of Earth-Sim. I love science fiction stories if they are done correctly and really showcase the new world that the reader is dropped into. I loved the idea of androids and holograms and simulations. All of those ideas are realistic enough for me to wrap my head around and feel like it could realistically happen. For me, that is the true test of a good story, even a science fiction story. Is it believable? Do I believe it could happen?

And the politics, fighting, debating, back stabbing seemed so realistic in this story I had no doubt it could all happen. I loved the idea of going to school to study these things and then putting those learned behaviors into practice. This story reminded me a lot of Ender's Game and how they had to learn to work together but not everyone was on the same page. Team mates tried to destroy each other. Everyone was looking out for themselves and trying to make themselves look better, even if that mean sabotaging their friends or those they were supposed to be working with. I loved how the characters in this story grew together. How they ultimately learned to become friends. Unfortunately it took a great catastrophe to bring them together, but sometimes it does take loss to bring people together in their time of need.