Presari Digital Guide to the Science of the National Parks

A real-time Internet search tool for discovering, exploring & enjoying the incredible universe of information, for travelers & scientific enthusiasts.

Non-Fiction - Environment
245 Pages
Reviewed on 10/29/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Daniel D Staats for Readers' Favorite

This is a different kind of book than most readers are used to. Paul J. Krupin invented a computer program he called Presari. His book, Presari Digital Guide to the Science of the National Parks, is an example of applying Presari. This book lists all the national parks—a total of 63—then uses the magic of Presari to cover 60 scientific topics for each park. One may describe this book as a researcher’s travel guide on steroids. What sets this book apart from the pack is the lack of text. Under the title of each national park, there are 60 sub-headings which are nothing but internet links. Click on the link, and you are connected to the internet with all types of data at your fingertips. The book does the searching for you.

Presari is powered by a computer program nothing short of the work of a genius. Paul J. Krupin demonstrates its versatility and usefulness in Presari Digital Guide to the Science of the National Parks. Paul is a retired attorney who holds an MS as well as a JD. He adapted his search engine program to write books that connect the user to the internet. I was amazed at how much information I could gather on the science of the national parks with just a click of my mouse. Paul’s work may put other research texts out of business. On the other hand, it is a very welcome addition to the world of science and national parks. This book will save untold hours researching the internet. A great educational tool.