Silver Haze

Silver Haze


Fiction - Womens
248 Pages
Reviewed on 02/19/2017
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (Goodreads, B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Donation Program, which was created to help nonprofit and charitable organizations (schools, libraries, convalescent homes, soldier donation programs, etc.) by providing them with free books and to help authors garner more exposure for their work. This author is willing to donate free copies of their book in exchange for reviews (if circumstances allow) and the knowledge that their book is being read and enjoyed. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email. Be sure to tell the author who you are, what organization you are with, how many books you need, how they will be used, and the number of reviews, if any, you would be able to provide.

Book Review

Reviewed by Benjamin Ookami for Readers' Favorite

Silver Haze by Pankaj Varma is the tale of an Indian woman's unwillingness to let her precious life's memories slip away because of dementia. Thus Kamala's story, which takes readers through many important historical events as well, is told in three different books which cover different aspects of Kamala's life. Having grown up in Punjab, many life-altering decisions had been made by Kamala's immediate family members without even bothering to find out how she might feel about it. The education she would get is one of them and another involves a traditionally arranged marriage. While they have been mostly friends, something could've happened between Kamala and Suresh if there weren't so many rules to abide by. Can a future decided by others lead to real happiness?

In Kamala's life up until her marriage, which takes place in Book 1, the author sets up many points for her and Suresh to be together in one scene. The author made me believe that fate wanted their relationship to evolve from friendship into something more, but at the same time it was obvious that the author also didn't want to make it possible for them. By the time Kamala gets married, Suresh sort of takes a background seat while Kamala truly starts loving her husband. Then, all of a sudden, Suresh is back. For me, the author presented me with conflicting feelings. My enjoyment of this chronicle of a fictitious Indian woman's life by Pankaj Varma came accompanied with worry for the protagonist's marriage.

The author took me through three stages of Kamala's life and I loved how everything came full circle. I thought Suresh was the ingredient that made this novel interesting. This book has the potential to be one that readers, if perhaps asked to recommend a women's fiction novel set in Punjab, would quickly recommend.

Deepak Menon

I think that Silver Haze deserves a 5 Star. The reviewer has stated that 'it was obvious that the author also didn't want to make it possible for them.'. This is incorrect since the story is a real life one and has stated the facts with the fabric of the times woven around them - and having read the book I am very clear that the author never tried to lead the reader to any conclusions - he just simply told a true life story. Whilst I know that a Readers Favorite 4 Star review is a big achievement, I personally feel that the book could have gone higher with a 5 star review because it has qualified as fine literature being the 'mirror of its times'.
Deepak Menon

Aman

Nice

Ranjana Bharij

I have read this book, a touching true story of a woman suffering from dementia. Meandering through the ups and downs of life, it portrays a life-like picture of its times when the social and cultural mores in the Indian society were so different from what we experience today.
The book, in my opinion, surely deserves a five star review.