The Heir and The Enchantress

The Enchantresses Book 5

Romance - Historical
243 Pages
Reviewed on 04/01/2021
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Author Biography

Celebrated for her complex characters, realistic conflicts, and sensual love scenes, Paullett Golden puts a spin on historical romance. Her novels, set primarily in Georgian and Regency England with some dabbling in Ireland, Scotland, and France, challenge the norm by involving characters who are loved for their flaws, imperfections, and idiosyncrasies. Her stories show love overcoming adversity. Whatever our self-doubts, love will out.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Jennifer Ibiam for Readers' Favorite

The Heir and the Enchantress by Paullett Golden is the fifth book in The Enchantresses' series. It's a historical romance novel that features two protagonists named Harold and Hazel. Harold had returned from business in India to meet his father's estate deep in debt. His father, Lord Collingwood, opted to regain their wealth through opium dealing, and he needed capital by any means, including duping his best friend. The opportunity presented itself when the reputation of his friend's daughter, Hazel, was allegedly tarnished. On the surface, everything looked fine because they were betrothed to each other as children, but Harold's father had long changed his mind. However, due to his debt, he accepted that Hazel and Harold could marry each other. Will this marriage ever progress into a love match? Will Lord Collingwood and his family's secret remain safe?

The Heir and the Enchantress by Paullett Golden is a fantastic historical novel that I enjoyed reading. The plot was unique and the story was flawlessly written. The dialogue flowed effortlessly, and the language was era-appropriate. I loved the simple writing style, as it made the story easy to follow. This novel explored themes like deceit, honor, greed, selflessness, etc. It also shed light on some notions that we hold dear as humans. We've been trained to honor our parents, but at what point do we draw the line, especially if it goes against our conscience? How do we create a balance between familial loyalty and protecting our spouses? Are we true to ourselves or do we do everything for the benefit of others? This book got me asking myself these questions. Paullett has written a great book, and I'd love to read more from this author.