A Secret Report to the True American Faith Society

Senior Citizens and Their Threat to America

Fiction - Humor/Comedy
246 Pages
Reviewed on 05/05/2015
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    Book Review

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite

A Secret Report to the True American Faith Society: Senior Citizens and Their Threat to America is a book of political satire by author Hy Brett. It focuses on the narrow-minded view that elements such as Social Security and Medicare have become costly elements of the American economy of which the privileged few believe the hardworking masses are undeserving. The primary focus of the satire lands on America’s senior citizens, who are viewed as a prime target for absurd new legislation, which may ruin the rest of the country to benefit a small group of very greedy people. The author intends the work to highlight this social and economic problem through the medium of humour, but states his clear intentions towards the issue as well.

The style of Hy Brett’s writing in the main section of the book is so serious and politically convincing that it takes a beat to realise where the humour is coming from. Once discovered, I found it to be a wry and extremely tongue in cheek look at politicians, who rule with their own ideals rather than by taking note of report or policy, and whose proclivity towards the power of prayer over the power of actual medical aid is both shocking and amusing. I feel that, as a Brit, if I knew more about the intricacies of American legislation and politics, I would have enjoyed it even more. As it stands, A Secret Report to the True American Faith Society is a witty and well-researched read for open-minded and tolerant audiences.