Beyond All Desiring

Beyond All Desiring


Fiction - Drama
200 Pages
Reviewed on 03/20/2009
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Anne Boling for Readers' Favorite

Beyond All Desiring by Judith Laura is the tale of Sara Lyons, a unique individual. Events shaped Sara’s life: the depression, the McCarthy era ,and many private actions. She lived through the depression. Lack of necessities shaped Sara’s life as it did many others. She became very tight fisted with her money and accumulated a tidy sum. No one would ever expect her financial worth for she lived a very simple life. Pregnancy in her teens changed her life. Then came the great “Terror”. The Terror changed her in ways that others never foresaw. Her family forced her to marry Victor. He repeatedly abused her. She escaped that nightmare and became a career woman. Her roommate, Melanie, was the love of her life. They hid their relationship out of fear of losing their jobs. Sara never truly recovered from Melanie’s death. Melanie was not the only woman in Sara’s life. Harry, her second husband, was a kind, gentle man, but he had many secrets. He introduced her to Buddhism. Only after her death did her family came to know a small part of the real Sara.

Do we really know one another? It is unfortunate that we do not take the time to get to know each other. Sara Lyons was an exceptional person, but no one in her family ever knew it. Beyond All Desiring is a beautiful story written by a talented Judith Laura. The plot has several twists and turns that kept this reader involved. Ms. Laura has a flair for giving each character a distinct voice. Well done! I highly recommend Beyond All Desiring to fans of fiction.

Virginia Reader on Amazon

This is a beautifully written novel about a woman no one in her family understands. She is an old woman when the novel opens, but we come to understand the life she lived as a teen during the Depression and a young woman during World War II, and the effect these experiences had on her. Things she did when young, which many of us today would consider acceptable, had to be hidden from family members back then if you wanted them to like you and if you wanted to keep your job. The main character, Sara had deep, lasting love relationships with both men and women. She lived without a telephone or TV, and kept to herself a lot.

There are also a number of other interesting characters: Sara's niece, Janice, a work-at-home mom; and her unmarried, career-conscious sister Barbara; Sara's rather weird husband, Harry, and others. Judith Laura has a way of bringing you inside the characters so that you see the world as they see it.