I Still Want to Be a Mom

I Still Want to Be a Mom

Leaving the Infertility Struggle Behind

Non-Fiction - Parenting
127 Pages
Reviewed on 07/27/2017
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Jack Magnus for Readers' Favorite

I Still Want to Be a Mom: Leaving the Infertility Struggle Behind is a nonfiction health/medical parenting guide written by Julie Pierce. Pierce is a fertility and healthy lifestyle coach, whose familiarity with the challenges faced by the many women for whom pregnancy is elusive, makes her a particularly empathetic and persuasive guide. Looking back, she knew she had done all the right things as she was growing up. Pierce had been determined not to become one of those accidental moms who had to give up their dreams of college and professional goals because of an unplanned pregnancy. She would finish her academic studies, enter the profession she had studied for, and wait until she and her husband were ready, financially and emotionally, for the next big step in their lives -- becoming parents. Pierce also wanted to ensure that she could personally support herself and a young family, and she wanted to explore life as a couple with her husband before they began the process. As with many of her clients, however, Pierce found herself besieged by the cruel, if well-intentioned, reminders from family and friends about her biological clock, the aging of her eggs and the “selfishness” of women who didn’t embrace motherhood. She also felt a growing imperative as she watched her friends start their own families, but when she and her husband decided to go ahead and make that baby, nothing happened.

Julie Pierce’s nonfiction health/wellness guide was of particular interest to me as I’ve had some problems understanding the imperative felt by many women who are willing to sacrifice so much to afford extraordinary expense and endure the discomfort involved in fertility treatment. I’ve also read a number of articles and columns written by women who had decided not to have children, detailing the intense criticism and outrage expressed toward them by family, friends and “well-meaners.” As someone who would never be that intimately involved in the process, I still wanted to understand what was going on in a substantial segment of the population. Pierce’s honest and moving account went a long way towards giving me the answers and providing the bridge to understanding that I was seeking. Her descriptions of the emotional curves of hope and despair experienced by women each month when trying to get pregnant was moving, and her shared account of the delivery of her stillborn daughter, Ava Catherine, really brought home the suffering and loss she experienced.

Pierce doesn’t promise fertility miracles -- no one can. What she does do is help women understand the intricate processes involved in baby-making and get them to a place where they can see, sense and feel their future lives as a mom. Her counseling is designed to get her clients to consider any emotional or deep-seated roadblocks to becoming a mom that might be interfering with the process, and for them to have a clearer sense of becoming one. Along the way, she commiserates with the sometimes awful, if well-meaning, interference of family and friends, and clarifies some misconceptions about biological clocks and past-their-sell-by-time eggs. Her book answered my own questions and gave me new insights into the biological urge for motherhood and the accompanying stress and hardship experienced by many. I Still Want to Be a Mom: Leaving the Infertility Struggle Behind is most highly recommended, not only for the target audience but also for the men in their lives.

Lori Moore

I Still Want to Be a Mom: Leaving the Fertility Struggle Behind by Julie A. Pierce is a heartfelt book, well-written with a personal passion by someone who has been there and done that. It will appeal to couples who are struggling with trying to start their families or have another baby, and experiencing disappointment at every turn. Julie shares her own story about the challenges of the fertility process, providing support and guidance to help you with yours. There are tools provided to help a struggling couple get through the tough emotional, financial, and even spiritual issues that occur during the trying-to-get-pregnant process.

Struggling with fertility is an exhausting and difficult issue for so many couples, but Julie A. Pierce offers hope and comfort in I Still Want To Be A Mom. I enjoyed her conversational style and tone in the book, as if I were sitting down having a conversation with her as opposed to reading a boring, scientific, clinical book on the subject of fertility. I especially enjoyed Chapter 5 – The C Word – which addresses the issues of being crazy enough to be committed, clarity, and creativity. As a woman who chose not to have children, I gained insight into how the fertility struggle impacts the couple that is so desirous of having children and how much they need patience, comfort, and choices. I see this book being a great comfort for those in the throes of wanting to get pregnant, but facing issues getting there.

Gisela Dixon

I Still Want to Be a Mom: Leaving the Infertility Struggle Behind by Julie Pierce is a non-fiction book on a topic that a lot of women face every day—infertility. I Still Want to Be a Mom stems from Julie’s insights and experiences with infertility herself. In this book, Julie Pierce details everything there is to know about the challenges of infertility without making it overly technical. There is never an overload of information and the book is broken down into easy, short chapters and sub-chapters. Some of the topics covered include the biochemistry of infertility, hormones, mental readiness to have a baby, various fertility treatments including IVF, how to learn to accept and love your body and yourself, and maintain equilibrium in times of stress, and of course the common experience of miscarriage and/or stillbirth, dealing with its grief and trauma while healing mind and body, and so much more.

I found I Still Want to Be a Mom by Julie Pierce to be an excellent book with a mind-body approach toward infertility. Julie not only discusses ways and methods to approach infertility, but also takes a realistic look at the pros and cons that come along with the responsibility of caring for and raising a child. Thus, she provides a balanced approach to parenting which I really liked because it is true that parenting is not for everyone and while some may want it, they may not be equipped to handle the tremendous responsibility and sacrifice that comes along with it. I also empathized with Julie’s personal experience with grief and anyone who has lost a child, and the real life cases presented in the book will definitely serve to encourage and help women who may be going through a similar experience in their lives. Julie’s candid and honest writing style makes this book not only educational and informative, but engaging as well.