Nobody Gets Out Of Catering Alive...


Non-Fiction - Memoir
217 Pages
Reviewed on 04/23/2020
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Jack Magnus for Readers' Favorite

Nobody Gets Out of Catering Alive is a humorous memoir written by Joe Montaperto. Joe always knew he had the gift to be a top comic but what happened? The other comics he had started out with were now-famous names -- and him? He was thirty years old, living in his parents’ house in Roselle, New Jersey, and ruefully watching as each pass through his once glorious curls left him more convinced than ever that he was indeed losing his hair. The highlights of his life now consisted of watching old movies and reruns of Lost in Space. What indeed had happened? His parents weren’t taking his decision to return to the nest lying down. They demanded that he get a job. It didn’t really matter that the cost of commuting and hours spent getting to his catering jobs barely made those jobs worthwhile. But as his thirties rushed along together, and he found himself facing the dreaded fortieth decade, his dreams were still unachieved. No college, no training, what could he do? He knew that he had the stuff to be just as big a comedic success as those others he had started out with. He just needed to get writing and develop his routines.

Joe Montaperto’s memoir, Nobody Gets Out of Catering Alive, is a well-written and entertaining look at the trials and tribulations of those stand-up hopefuls, the ones who were warned not to give up their day jobs. I especially enjoyed those looks at his early thirties. The catering scenes are packed with humor and ample loads of self-deprecation. The only issue I had with this book was that the author’s comedic material frequently appears without warning, leaving me a bit confused as to how we went from Joe’s memoirs to something completely different. They are all marvelous creations, but a more rigorous tie-in to the memoir would have made me feel less at a loss sometimes. Nobody Gets Out of Catering Alive is recommended.