The Last Angel To Fall

Jubal Stone Series

Fiction - Fantasy - Urban
Kindle Edition
Reviewed on 02/03/2022
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Brian G. Walsh is the award-winning author of the acclaimed cross-genre Jubal Stone Series which includes "The Last Angel To Fall," the first volume in the Jubal Stone Series which has been hailed by Kirkus Reviews as "A powerhouse first volume in a supernatural thriller series." "The Last Angel To Fall" was also the recipient of the Gold Award from Literary Titan for September 2021. Readers Favorite has awarded it with a 5-Star Review: "Brian G. Walsh is a master of symbolism and the deconstructing of scriptural wordplay with the imagination to pull it all together."

"A Cold Day In Hell," the second novel in this series which follows Jubal Stone's investigation regarding the disappearance of the ambassador at the American Embassy in Hell, has also been well received by readers.

Walsh is also the author of "No Place For Mercy: An Eclectic Anthology" of short stories that some have compared to the writing of Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Stephen King, Edgar Allan Poe, Rod Serling and Dean Koontz. Brian was born and raised in Lynn, Massachusetts and currently lives in Jackson, Michigan.

Walsh is also a three-time screenwriting fellowship & contest finalist, screenwriting consultant, screenwriting instructor, script coverage provider and script reader for four international screenplay contests.

Brian has worked as a script reader for four international screenplay contests and has taught screenwriting in Jackson and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Jamie Michele for Readers' Favorite

The Last Angel To Fall by Brian G. Walsh is a speculative urban novel and the first book in the bold new Jubal Stone series. Diplomatic Security Service agent Jubal Stone, a desolate, cynical, and flawed protagonist with a sullied reputation, has been tasked with “the most sensitive mission you or anybody else on this planet has ever been assigned to.” A Fallen Angel has crash-landed on Earth, hell is real, and there is a government of Lucifer with the real story, not the one we've been lied to about since Genesis. The hunt that ensues involves agencies and individuals—both human and non—with a wide range of different motives. Told from alternating points of view, the unfolding of facts might just prove that the devil we know may not truly be better than the devil we don't. But first, Jubal has to find the Fallen One. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God,” I said. “And the Word *was* God.”

What a wild ride that was! The Last Angel To Fall is the gift that keeps on giving and Brian G. Walsh is a master of symbolism and the deconstructing of scriptural wordplay with the imagination to pull it all together. I most enjoyed it when the shift moved to the point of view of Immanuel. There is an authenticity that is immediately prevalent and Walsh makes The Archangel into a living, breathing character in the first few chapters. It is the arc of Immanuel that is the gem here though and it is really fantastic. There is also a palpable intrigue to the “other” character Asheba that carries throughout the book, although moving past the sexy female trope required some tenacity. Fortunately, Walsh provides a rationale for Asheba's appearance and actions that soften the image. All's well that ends well, right? Incredibly, Jubal is possibly the least interesting but this means very little in a story where everyone is intensely well developed. The writing is clean and tight, the pace is perfect and fast-moving, the sizzle factor is well executed...and I am excited to see where Walsh takes us in book two.