The Last Human


Young Adult - Sci-Fi
216 Pages
Reviewed on (not set)
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Donation Program, which was created to help nonprofit and charitable organizations (schools, libraries, convalescent homes, soldier donation programs, etc.) by providing them with free books and to help authors garner more exposure for their work. This author is willing to donate free copies of their book in exchange for reviews (if circumstances allow) and the knowledge that their book is being read and enjoyed. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email. Be sure to tell the author who you are, what organization you are with, how many books you need, how they will be used, and the number of reviews, if any, you would be able to provide.

Author Biography

Ink is a romantic and a dreamer, an optimist and a realist, and, truth be told, a bit of a contradiction.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Tina Stanciu for Readers' Favorite

Imagine yourself struggling for your life and for the life of the one you love. Imagine being pulled away from your home, taken to a facility where you are abused by the very same people that were meant to serve and protect you. Imagine that the world you know is coming to an end and that people, with their poor decision-making skills, have pushed it over the edge. You’re only a confused teen, having to deal with all of humanity’s mistakes and wrongful ambitions, how could you survive? This is Clay’s story, The Last Human, as written by Ink Pieper. A story about endings, wars, love, maturity, and suffering. A story too complex to summarize in just a few words, a story with so many plot twists that you, the reader, have no other alternative but to keep on reading, and imagining, and empathizing with the characters. As the story unfolds, it doesn’t even feel like you are reading a book; it all feels real and the images you draw in your head make you challenge everything you know about the world you live in.

The Last Human is not just an end-of-the-world story; it is a story about choices and crossroads, about what too much power can do to humanity. This book makes you wonder if we are on the right path, if we are not slowly destroying the world we live in by caring more about frivolities than we care about our loved ones and the place that we call home. Clay’s story is unpredictable, from beginning to end, and even though it has some rough parts that some readers might think are too much to handle, they are, in fact, what makes it all so real. These parts make you see this not as just a book, but more as a life lesson.

Kayti Nika Raet

The Last Human by the cleverly named Ink Pieper, features a post-apocalyptic world reeling from the recent aftermath of biological warfare and nuclear fallout. Clay lives in a partially submerged Florida, roaming from place to place after both his moms caught a deadly virus and were taken away by the government, which has turned shady in this time of crisis. Eventually, he gets taken away as well and his dark journey to The Rose Garden concentration camp begins. Luckily, he manages to escape the dour place and starts on a post-apocalyptic road trip with three other freshly escaped detainees. It's a road trip filled with guns, limited options, and burned-out scenery. Told in a stream of consciousness narrative, The Last Human is a novel filled with clever book references, Star Wars' conversations, hope, and despair.

Though it is called The Last Human, Clay isn't alone for very long and sometimes I felt the pacing in the beginning was a little jarring. I often was not aware that a scene had changed until several paragraphs after the fact. But after a rocky beginning, The Last Human flows along much better and any little quirks in what can be an interesting main character are answered by the shocking twist near the end. The Last Human is a very fast paced read and was a book that I stayed up late into the night reading; it was also the first thing I picked up in the morning.

Carol Thompson

"It’s morbidly depressing to be alone. It feels as if all life drains from you even though, theoretically, I am a fairly healthy individual. I eat my fruits and veggies. I eat my meats…well I eat fish at least. The fruits aren’t ripe either. The vegetables are whatever I can scavenge and are rarely in the pristine condition I always hope to find them in. It sounds as if maybe I’m a vagabond, maybe I’m a bum, but I’m not. I’m just a person like you."

That's the opening paragraph of Ink Pieper's, The Last Human, and with a lead like that, who can resist reading more. The writing throughout the book is engaging and attention-holding. The author certainly has a way with prose and a talent for story and character development. Clay is a parentless teen, fighting for his freedom and his life as the world, and the America he had known, decays. Clay is so well developed that he seems real. It's rare that an author can make a character come to life the way Pieper did. The only drawback to the book is that it's not well edited. Fortunately, the writing is strong enough to overlook a lot of it. It is a good book for fantasy fans and older readers of Young Adult fiction. The author moves through the story at a good pace with fluidity and certainly doesn't bore the reader.

Carol Thompson

"It’s morbidly depressing to be alone. It feels as if all life drains from you even though, theoretically, I am a fairly healthy individual. I eat my fruits and veggies. I eat my meats…well I eat fish at least. The fruits aren’t ripe either. The vegetables are whatever I can scavenge and are rarely in the pristine condition I always hope to find them in. It sounds as if maybe I’m a vagabond, maybe I’m a bum, but I’m not. I’m just a person like you."

That's the opening paragraph of Ink Pieper's, The Last Human, and with a lead like that, who can resist reading more. The writing throughout the book is engaging and attention-holding. The author certainly has a way with prose and a talent for story and character development. Clay is a parentless teen, fighting for his freedom and his life as the world, and the America he had known, decays. Clay is so well developed that he seems real. It's rare that an author can make a character come to life the way Pieper did. The only drawback to the book is that it's not well edited. Fortunately, the writing is strong enough to overlook a lot of it. It is a good book for fantasy fans and older readers of Young Adult fiction. The author moves through the story at a good pace with fluidity and certainly doesn't bore the reader.

Kayti Nika Raet

The Last Human by the cleverly named Ink Pieper, features a post-apocalyptic world reeling from the recent aftermath of biological warfare and nuclear fallout. Clay lives in a partially submerged Florida, roaming from place to place after both his moms caught a deadly virus and were taken away by the government, which has turned shady in this time of crisis. Eventually, he gets taken away as well and his dark journey to The Rose Garden concentration camp begins. Luckily, he manages to escape the dour place and starts on a post-apocalyptic road trip with three other freshly escaped detainees. It's a road trip filled with guns, limited options, and burned-out scenery. Told in a stream of consciousness narrative, The Last Human is a novel filled with clever book references, Star Wars' conversations, hope, and despair.

Though it is called The Last Human, Clay isn't alone for very long and sometimes I felt the pacing in the beginning was a little jarring. I often was not aware that a scene had changed until several paragraphs after the fact. But after a rocky beginning, The Last Human flows along much better and any little quirks in what can be an interesting main character are answered by the shocking twist near the end. The Last Human is a very fast paced read and was a book that I stayed up late into the night reading; it was also the first thing I picked up in the morning.