The Perfect Culture


Fiction - Cultural
280 Pages
Reviewed on 08/11/2019
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Gisela Dixon for Readers' Favorite

The Perfect Culture by Brent Robins is a novel about a young American named Thomas and some of his experiences of international travel and the perspectives gained from it. In this book, Thomas is a student at college in Indiana. However, he senses a feeling of unfulfillment and never quite fits into the conventional mold of a college student. He decides to expand his horizons and lands in France while doing some hotel work. After living there for a few months, he gets a chance to go to Japan and work there and after that Israel, while working at a kibbutz, or communal settlement. In the midst of his travels, he also meets an Israeli girl called Sendi. The book thus mostly talks about the places, experiences, the various cultures that Thomas encounters in many countries, his perspectives and reflections from a first-person point of view, and intends to bring us closer together as one humanity as a true world traveler.

I liked The Perfect Culture and found it to be a fun, entertaining, and also at times a thought-provoking read. Having traveled to some of the countries explored in the book myself, Thomas’s experiences resonate and it is obvious that Brent has written the book after researching customs and people. I liked Thomas’s character portrayal and his commentary and narrative have been presented as genuine, sincere, and with just the right touch of naiveté of someone who is exploring the world for the first time. Brent’s swift and engaging writing style and story ultimately present the fact that global travel is a must for every person where possible. It not only opens up the mind to new possibilities but also makes us realize how similar we all are in spite of superficial differences, which is a crucial lesson for anyone to learn. I would highly recommend this book.