The Spruce Gum Box


Fiction - Historical - Event/Era
278 Pages
Reviewed on 06/08/2011
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Late to the craft, but no less committed and enthusiastic, Elizabeth Wilder launched her debut novel June 30,2010 on her 72nd birthday.

The seed of the story, The Spruce Gum Box, took root in her mind after a trip to northern Maine to explore her husband's family background. It left her with many questions about the settlers and the Aroostook War (1838). After five years of research and a year of writing, the story matured.

"I truly love writing historical fiction for one takes the facts as best known and mixes them with imagination from the recesses of your mind to create a story."

She is a senior that never gave up on her dream to write a novel. Her background in the arts, as a teacher and 'jack of all trades' plus raising a family presented a lot of experiences on which to draw.

Her day to day musings are found in 'Elizabeth Wilder's Blog' - www.LizLogic.com . She tweets regularly as @eewilder and is a member of The Independent Author Network (IAN).

An active resident of a senior community, she writes on senior issues and enjoys finding folks not about to let age be anything but a number - those who age with abandon.

At present she is writing a sequel, Granite Hearts.

A native of New England, she now lives in PA with her husband of 51 years and of course Smokey the cat.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Karen Pirnot for Readers' Favorite

The Spruce Gum Box is author Elizabeth Wilder's debut novel and she has tweaked the imagination of readers with interest in the cultural and historical development of the state of Maine. Set by the Aroostook River in a disputed area bordering Nova Scotia, a young British man falls in love with the daughter of a wealthy lumber industry executive. Their love is forbidden, and when a child is conceived and born out of wedlock, the young man Jed is faced with having to protect his infant son and himself from retaliation and certain death.

As boundary issues are pursued between the United States and Great Britain, Jed happens upon a settlement of Micmac Indians who befriend and protect him. In kind, Jed learns Native American ways and he grows to be an important member of the Micmac community. When the tribe attempts to explore getting into the lumbering business in order to protect the interests of the tribe, Jed is instrumental in assisting the Micmacs toward their goal of becoming independent land owners.

The author obviously engaged in considerable research for this novel and, as a result, it is a pleasure to read, both from an historical and a cultural aspect. Ms. Wilder writes well, and her characters are interesting and well developed. She weaves Native American habits and spirit into her story, and she does it in such a manner that her characters are both believable and endearing to the reader. This book would be a good read for anyone wanting to learn about Native American populations who fought to keep the land on which their ancestors thrived.