The Supremacist Syndrome

How Domination Underpins Slavery, Genocide, the Exploitation of Women, and the Maltreatment of Animals

Non-Fiction - Social Issues
324 Pages
Reviewed on 09/30/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

The Supremacist Syndrome by Peter Marsh presents Heinrich Himmler as a poster example for the subtitle topic: How Domination Underpins Slavery, Genocide, the Exploitation of Women, and the Maltreatment of Animals. As the author notes, this book discusses three types of supremacism: white supremacism, male supremacism, and anti-Semitic nationalist supremacism. These three case studies allow us to understand the parallels among supremacist ideologies, why they are persistent, and how to overcome them. Another interesting aspect of this work is how it touches on our treatment of animals and has the core features of supremacism that most of us are unaware of. It demonstrates the relationship of one type of prejudice to another. As an example, did you know that racists are likely to be sexists too, or that anyone who has a certain element of prejudice is likely to condone other people's inhumane or exploitative practices?

We all expected that the horrors of World War II would put an end to the anti-Semitic and supremacist ideologies that pervaded in those turbulent times. Sadly, we are witnessing that supremacism remains resilient like a surviving cockroach during a nuclear fallout. Peter Marsh does a great service in writing about the subject for the purpose of education and awareness. Our psyche has a biased leaning toward those who are similar to us. The Supremacist Syndrome may become a manifesto for humane education programs and an invaluable lesson in how our misplaced sense of pride can evolve into prejudice. Supremacist ideologies may persist, but Marsh proves that it has no place in a civilized society. This is a must-read work of nonfiction that is enlightening and reassuring in the fact that the supremacist syndrome is a mere vestige of a primitive stage of evolution.