Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout

A Kid's Guide to Feelings

Children - Educational
40 Pages
Reviewed on 02/08/2015
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Author Biography

Dr. Peggy Kruger Tietz is a licensed psychologist and maintains a private practice in Austin, Texas. She sees a wide range of children with normal developmental problems as well as children who have experienced trauma. Her Ph.D is in developmental psychology from Bryn Mawr College. Dr. Tietz, specializes in seeing children individually, as well as, with their families. Her family training was at the Family Institute of Philadelphia, where she also taught second year students. She has advanced training in Play Therapy as well being a certified practitioner of EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing). Before entering private practice Dr. Tietz treated children in multiple settings, such as family service agencies and foster care. She has conducted workshops on parenting, sibling relationships, and emotional literacy.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Kelly Santana for Readers' Favorite

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger Tietz, Ph.D. is invaluable educational reading. As the title suggests, the book discusses eight of our emotions in a friendly and easy way: anger, fear, shame, sadness, happiness, love, disgust, and surprise. The book is meant to help children understand and learn to verbalize their feelings, and to assist parents and guardians in guiding them. Feelings are universal and can be recognized by certain attitudes. When one is angry, one may shout. When one is fearful, one may shake, run or hide. When one is ashamed, one may look away. When one is sad, one may cry. When one is happy, one may laugh and giggle. When one is loved, one cares and wants to help. When one is disgusted, one may cringe and cover the eyes. When one is surprised, one may jump and scream. The book is completed with illustrations and examples of what triggers those feelings, reactions from the person expressing them and the psychological meaning behind those emotions. It also gives tips to parents, caregivers and teachers in how to use this tool.

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger Tietz, Ph.D is a delightful book. I loved everything about it, from the illustrations to the content. Identifying certain feelings can be hard for children of different age groups. Dr. Tietz nails it when she gives simple, real life examples to assist children in grasping those concepts. The reading got even more fun when she rhymes the explanations and fills it with relatable illustrations. Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings allows for young readers, parents, and educators to win in multiple ways. Children have fun mimicking the characters, building vocabulary and setting up the foundation for self-awareness. Parents have an interactive tool to discuss with their child. Teachers can make the most out of it through reading, classroom discussion, and building a strong community of learners. I certainly recommend it.