Clare

A Novel

Fiction - Cultural
662 Pages
Reviewed on 07/03/2011
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Susan Lynn Peterson has made a career of writing about complex topics in a straightforward, entertaining way. Her books range in topic from martial arts to history, from business to computers. What they all have in common is her interest in taking a few years to wrestle a topic to the ground before presenting it to the reader. Her Timeline Charts of the Western Church took ten years to put together. While writing Western Herbs for Martial Artists and Contact Athletes, she looked at several hundred articles and studies. While writing Clare, she flew to Ireland, and walked the streets her character would walk.

Between the five of them, her books have been translated into five languages. Her Timeline Charts of the Western Church earned a Gold Medallion Book award nomination. Western Herbs for Martial Artists and Contact Athletes won the 2010 USA Book News Best Book Award in the Alternative Medicine category.

Susan Lynn Peterson holds an MA in Linguistics, and MA in Religion, and a Ph.D. in the Humanities, Text Theory. She has taught writing, critical thinking, history, and history of Western thought in colleges and universities. These days, when she is not writing, she teaches karate at Black Pine Martial Arts and runs Alcuin Communications, an Internet and print media communications company. She resides with her family in Tucson, Arizona.

I'm on Facebook ("Susan Lynn Peterson" under pages) and the web: www.susanlynnpeterson.com

    Book Review

Reviewed by Brenda Casto for Readers' Favorite

The Keane children, Clare, Mick and Tom, hadn't had an easy life since their father died. Their mother did the best she could to support them, and Clare, her fourteen-year-old daughter, worked along side her to earn what money they could; but when their mother dies, Claire makes a deathbed promise to keep the family together. The only family they have left is their uncle, Ronan, who lives in America; so they send him a telegram, and when he responds with three boat tickets to America, the Keane children leave all they know in Ireland in the hopes for a new beginning in America.

You know that you have read a great story when you can't quit thinking about the characters, and that's just how it was for me. The Keane siblings wormed their way into my heart, and I found myself wanting to reach out and help them. Even though the children didn't have an easy life, they never gave up hope that things would get better for them. The author brings to life the journey the children took, and one of the most interesting aspects for me was when the children were trying to come through Ellis Island. While there were a few people that helped the children on their journey, I felt, for Clare, things really started to change when they went to live in the Catholic Children's Protectory of of New York. When they were put on the orphan train, I could just imagine the emotional turmoil they felt. While they had hopes of a family, they had the fear of being separated. Although I thought the author wrapped up the ending quite nicely, I am certainly holding out hopes that perhaps the author will write a sequel to this one. I would love to see how the Keane children fared after a few years in America.