Gold in Havilah

A Novel of Cain's Wife

Christian - Historical Fiction
344 Pages
Reviewed on 09/21/2019
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Donation Program, which was created to help nonprofit and charitable organizations (schools, libraries, convalescent homes, soldier donation programs, etc.) by providing them with free books and to help authors garner more exposure for their work. This author is willing to donate free copies of their book in exchange for reviews (if circumstances allow) and the knowledge that their book is being read and enjoyed. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email. Be sure to tell the author who you are, what organization you are with, how many books you need, how they will be used, and the number of reviews, if any, you would be able to provide.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Ankita Shukla for Readers' Favorite

Gold in Havilah: A Novel of Cain's Wife by Jean Hoefling explores the extent of Akliah's desire to be with her brother, Cain. In addition to her infatuation, the book explores how far Cain wandered away from the righteous path of his parents due to his insatiable thirst for searching for the unknown. While Eve and Adam were too focused on the prophecy, which declared that their seed would crush the head of Serpens, Cain felt his parents did not appreciate his skills. Anytime Cain would try showing off his talents, Adam rebuked him for not contemplating the ways to crush Serpens.

Gold in Havilah appears to be about the beginning of time; however, it is closer to our time in so many ways that it's astounding. Kids seek acknowledgment from their parents and when they feel unaccepted, they lose their way. This attribute is very efficiently evident in Cain's character. He could not get Adam to recognize his many skills that had nothing to do with the prophecy. Therefore, he began looking for recognition elsewhere. When Lilith praised his abilities and encouraged him, he could not help but be drawn toward her. The author has not shied away from plumbing the depths of negativity that Cain would have fallen into in the company of Lilith. He did despicable things and began detesting his parents' ways of doing things. Even after his few encounters with the divine, he could not discern his transgressions.

The author has taken complete creative freedom in the book, which made it a compelling read. Whether it was the inner turmoil of Akliah or the conversations of the characters, each aspect was relatable. The author ensured that the story did not become predictable by placing just enough twists to keep the reader on the edge of their seat. I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy a dark twist to their historical fiction. Although some may not like how negatively Cain has been portrayed in this story, more openminded readers will commend the author for her imagination.