Identity Crisis


Fiction - Social Issues
353 Pages
Reviewed on 01/07/2022
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    Book Review

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite

Identity Crisis by author T.K. Kanwar is a work of fiction in the contemporary social issues and interpersonal drama subgenres. It is intended for the mature adult reading audience owing to the use of moderate explicit language throughout and the presence of violent scenes. Written from the perspective of the politically conservative right, the story follows characters who are navigating today’s woke culture and experiencing disassociation and a yearning for the world they grew up in. One such character is Jennifer, a young woman who becomes deeply disillusioned with the ideal of 'progressive America' she thought she was working toward, and another is Canadian Sam Dhillon, who is quick to discover he’s not the only one experiencing such profound discontent.

Author T.K. Kanwar presents a lesser-represented perspective in this politically and socially charged contemporary novel, and the portrayal of these characters is done with sincerity, honesty, and conviction. Whatever your personal politics, there’s a lot to be learned from stepping into the shoes of others and seeing the world through their eyes, which Kanwar presents with authenticity and a confident command of narrative skill. There was a good balance between the characters’ personal journeys, the social issues discussed, and the actual plot of the novel, which had a lot of intrigue, mystery, and surprises along the way. The religious undertones of the work present an interesting thematic spin on the idea of dystopia in the modern age. For anyone seeking a thought-provoking and original new conservating-thinking read, I’d recommend picking up a copy of Identity Crisis.