Another Day in Milestoneville


Fiction - Action
563 Pages
Reviewed on 10/10/2021
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

Another Day in Milestoneville by Golden November is a dialogue-based story that eliminates the nitty-gritty details and gets right into the heart of the matter based on character speech. The story begins in 1994 when a 24-year-old guy known as G goes on a job interview for the remarkable job of helping others. Aside from helping evacuate people from hurricanes, the company has a book recovery division. G is to become a book hunter with a salary of $24,000.00. It requires plenty of travel, and it sounds like a dream job. During training, however, G discovers that the physical training involving skydiving seems like a job that could rival Ethan Hunt's in Mission Impossible. On top of it, it requires a strict moral code that G needs to follow. As the job becomes very demanding, G will reach a burnout point that will make him break free.

Golden November brilliantly supplements this dialogue-based story with photographs to heighten the setting. The first chapter offers promise for non-stop excitement, and I realized that such promise pays off. It has great things in it. Any bibliophile would kill to hunt down rare books, and the author takes this idea like a lump of clay and shapes life into it. What's best about G's quest is the way he encounters the fascinating characters of Milestoneville. November has a cutting-edge storytelling style that can well be adapted as a stage play for its dialogue-driven plot. These are dialogues that evoke the atmosphere in their brevity. Another Day in Milestoneville is a novel that can be easily read in one sitting.

Jamie Michele

Another Day in Milestoneville by Golden November is part of the author’s The Characters of Milestoneville canon, including The Characters of Milestoneville and Flower Rose. As with the other books, November employs a dialogue-only style composed without scene-setting or general narrative. It is left to the reader to do with it what they’d like and is best shared with others who may appreciate this unique storytelling style. In this installment, the author provides a backstory on individuals cast in the Milestoneville universe at later dates, primarily G and JBT, who are Milestoneville showrunners. The flashbacks might be a change from the November norm, but the pictures inserted to set the tone are not, allowing readers to see what the author envisions within the context of their style.

Golden November has the gift of the gab when it comes to Another Day in Milestoneville. A bit of familiarity with the characters as you open the book definitely heightened the experience. Having the sequel be a prequel works best this way as I felt knowing the protagonists was helpful in a non-linear sequence. I found the pacing to be off a bit, and there were moments of tedium, but setting aside the stylistic choice of writing and focusing on the intent behind it allowed me to sit back and have a few good chuckles. The quips are fired off in rapid succession, and that helps lighten the reader’s experience. There’s just something about a pair in a storm asking, “Dude, is that ocean or street...” only to be met with, “This truck is turning into a boat...” that sets the tone for levity at a time when real life and post-pandemic anxiety is running high. And sometimes, a smile and a laugh are all we need.