Chindi


Fiction - Horror
236 Pages
Reviewed on 10/10/2021
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite

Chindi is a work of fiction in the horror subgenre and was penned by author Timothy Bryan. Set in 1862 in California, this historical horror takes a supernatural twist when an ancient Native American demon awakens and begins to wreak havoc. Whole villages are left empty, with Native Americans and American soldiers alike going missing. At the center of it all, Lieutenant George Crook already has enough trouble keeping the peace without this new disturbance, but now he must investigate the terrifying goings-on before even more people suffer. And to do so, he’ll have to unite with former enemies and find aid in the most unlikely places.

Author Timothy Bryan sets an eerily authentic historical context for this spine-tingling story, and the realism in the details and descriptions makes it all the more terrifying when the supernatural elements come into play later on. The work is well penned to be psychologically terrifying without the need to be overly graphic, making it suitable for horror fans of all taste levels to still get a kick out of it. I especially enjoyed the atmosphere and tensions between the two sides and their tentative peace, which was well balanced via the sharp dialogue moments and vivid, cinematic descriptions of people’s body language, attitudes, and expressions. When you combine this with the fast-paced plot and inventive subversion of typical monster tropes to produce some very surprising twists, the result is an unmissable read for horror fans everywhere. I would highly recommend Chindi, and I can’t wait to see what else Timothy Bryan can do.

Lexie Fox

Chindi is a horror story written by Timothy Bryan. It is set in California in 1862, following Lieutenant George Crook as he tries to keep the peace between the distrustful Native Americans and his increasingly tense soldiers. As the fragile ceasefire between the two sides struggles to stay intact, entire villages and soldiers are disappearing, and an ancient evil awakens that is willing to kill indiscriminately. The tension in this story is palpable as Crook tries to ensure that the violence stays at bay between the two factions. His own men are on edge and in unfamiliar territory. The locals have been given many reasons not to trust them.

In his depiction of George Crook, author Timothy Bryan does an incredible job of depicting the world of problems that he carries on his shoulders even before the true evil of the book makes its presence known. There is a sense of gradual suffocation by his responsibilities. It is also present in the descriptive writing, which details the hostile land in which George walks. The addition of a monster to the horror story seems unnecessary at first, but when that monster – an ancient demon from Native American culture – appears, the story experiences an exciting and dynamic shift. Even in the face of this creeping horror, the anxiety of sharing space with people who could turn on you at any moment creates a tense atmosphere of constant suspicion and dread. Chindi is a novel that succeeds in squeezing every drop of horror from the world around it and conveying that feeling of relentless peril to the reader. This is an absolute must for horror fans everywhere.

Pikasho Deka

Chindi by Timothy Bryan is a supernatural horror story set in the remote countryside of a newly-formed California in 1862. Lieutenant George Crook's attempts to maintain peace with the local Native Indian tribes suffer a devastating blow when a Union soldier and a local man are found brutally murdered. On the orders of Captain Judah, an incompetent drunk, he sets off to tribal Chief Hakan's village with eight men to apprehend him for the crimes of his tribe. However, along the way, Crook and his men are attacked by dead men possessed by demons. After conversing with Chief Hakan, Crook learns that an ancient evil, Chindi, has taken control of the dead and is hellbent on destroying humans. Crook must form a fragile alliance with Hakan to rid the land of Chindi once and for all.

Author Timothy Bryan's spooky and gore-filled tale of survival against an ancient evil will appeal to fans of slasher horror movies and lovers of historical fiction alike. Chindi is full of suspense, horror, and plenty of gore. With a fast and smooth-flowing narrative, the author mixes a delicious blend of terror-filled thrills and military action set in the 19th century that keeps your eyes glued to the pages. The characters are well-realized, full of complex layers and contradictions that make them all the more compelling to read. I particularly enjoyed the banter between the soldiers: it was realistic and brought a bit of levity to the story. I would highly recommend Chindi to fans of horror novels.

Susan Sewell

When a miner digs up an ancient native artifact, an evil spirit seeks revenge in the supernatural novel, Chindi by Timothy Bryan. While working on their new gold claim, two brothers uncover an old Indian pouch covered in glyphs and inadvertently release Chindi, an ancient demon. Possessed by the spirit, the two miners become the first recruits for Chindi's army of the dead. Chindi and his demonic force march across the land, hunting and killing every human in their path. At Fort Hollenbush, Captain Judah believes the local Indian tribe is responsible for the slaughter and orders Lieutenant Crook to arrest their chief, Hakan. Lieutenant Crook has Sergeant Loraine choose a group of his best men to search for Chief Hakan. Chindi ambushes them along the way, killing two of their number. Barely escaping with their lives, Crook and his remaining men continue with their mission to locate the chief. Hakan knows who Chindi is, his history, and what drives him. Despite Sergeant Loraine's distrust and antipathy toward the natives, Crook allies himself with the chief to bring an end to Chindi. But is Sergeant Loraine right in his assumptions? Is Hakan luring them into a trap?

Set in California during the American Civil War, Timothy Bryan's Chindi is a heart-stopping horror story infused with a supernatural element. Superbly written, this exciting page-turner has an intense plot and a thrilling storyline that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. The historical aspects of the tale combined with zombie-like creatures are a unique and fascinating twist. Sprinkled throughout the story are breathtaking action-packed fight scenes between the living and the dead, creating an unforgettable, spine-tingling tale that will chill and thrill fans of the horror film Night of the Living Dead. Due to the graphic and bloody scenes of violence, I recommend it to those over thirteen.

Vincent Dublado

Set in 1862, Chindi by Timothy Bryan tells the story of Lieutenant George Crook, who is trying to keep the peace between the Native Americans and remote settlers. He and his men find themselves in a hostile environment. His initial investigation indicates that the natives show no sign of hiding their intrusions. Crook and his men wonder why they have started stirring up trouble after keeping to themselves peacefully for years. What is even more mind-boggling is that they find the local villages deserted. What they are about to face is a formidable enemy that will require them to work with a local tribal chief for all of them to survive. Chindi is a Native American demon who can bring new demons to new men. They can multiply to wipe out as many enemies as possible.

Chindi by Timothy Bryan weaves a spine-tingling spell that is rooted in death and fear. Rarely does a horror novel keep you anxious and uneasy, yet at the same time, Timothy Bryan’s novel evokes the mystery of the unknown, and it happens in an era when settling in a new frontier is paved with hostilities. A novel like Chindi is the kind of horror novel that doesn’t rely on cheap scares. It’s a suspenseful story with vulnerable characters that you will root for despite their flaws because in the battle against the supernatural, the resilience and courage of mortals become weapons in themselves, and we all possess it. George Crook is a good model of what a resolute officer stands for. He listens to the opinions of his men, whether right or wrong, weighs them carefully, and in the end, comes up with a decision that yields the most favorable result for everyone concerned. Unmissable.