Enok and the Womb of Gods


Christian - Fantasy/Sci-Fi
482 Pages
Reviewed on 11/12/2020
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Author Biography

Travel has long been my cardinal muse, but in the shadow of viral pandemics I can admit only to the stay-at-home fingering of ancient classics and anything on cosmology, paleontology, or lost civilizations. I remain at heart, however, that nerdy kid who long devoured a book a week and all of them science fiction.

My qualifications span both science and theology. As both a former Christian Religious Eduction teacher and a published Scientist, my longstanding passion has been to delve into the primordial elements of the Genesis narratives with a scientist’s curiosity. To me, scientific rationalism and spirituality are complementary rather than mutually exclusive modes of understanding. I write, therefore, from a position where like the tension between the heart and mind, the interplay between the two informs a unified whole.

The quest in writing the Enok story has been to explore the primordial Biblical narratives as factual history — not to provide answers, but to invite reflection. Who were the serpents of Eden, really? What become of them? How did the human and serpent races fare after the Watcher invasion and the rise of the trans-human Nephilim?

The fantasy genre generally has dwelt long enough on sword-and-sorcery myth. It’s time for exploring a new milieu, that of the post-Edenic antediluvian Genesis — the world that some believe Tolkien was actually alluding to in his “middle earth” fantasies.
Going forward, I hope to continue exploring the antediluvian milieu in a series of reflective fantasy works.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

Enok and the Womb of Gods by André SkoroBogáty takes you into an ancient world that is dominated by gods and monsters. It combines religion and classical myths to create an original fantasy adventure. The story revolves around a slave named Enok, who serves an ancient race of serpents that dwell on a remote island. Under servitude, he educates himself so that his captors may eye him as their equals. For the first time, he meets other humans when a ship is wrecked on the island, and it stokes his desire to plan his escape from the island. Being accused of a crime he did not commit, he had nothing to lose in risking escape along with the other castaways. And in his quest to find out the truth about his past, an ancient reliquary must be opened.

Enok and the Womb of Gods is reminiscent of the high adventures of Greek mythology. The action and tension build up as you progress in reading. SkoroBogáty’s writing style will appeal to a large audience for his lively (and even scholarly) interpretations of ancient myths and culture. His novel brings into brilliant focus the harmony of science and theology with lyrical power and simplicity. Be prepared for some extras like annotations, glossary, exordium, and author’s notes, as if André SkoroBogáty wants to make sure that you get fully immersed. With or without these extras, you can dive straight into the story for that experience. Enok and the Womb of Gods is highly entertaining and at the same time affirms the strength of the classical past.