Meth VS Death

"No Way Out"

Non-Fiction - Autobiography
370 Pages
Reviewed on 05/27/2018
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

I am 36 and live in Fairview Tn. I have a wonderful wife Amber whom is also a huge part of my story. A seven year old son Christian Rainey. I currently work at Middle Tennessee Lumber as a maintenance technician. There is no darker or deeper hole to climb out of than the one I was in when I began writing my life story. I wouldn't wish it on anyone. The second time I was busted for manufacturing methamphetamine, I was sitting in jail facing 15 years to serve at 85 percent. I was completely broken and I started to write. Two years in jail and a year on the prison compound in an extensive residential rehab and my book was complete. Writing was my only outlet. I poured every thing I had into these pages.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Lesley Jones for Readers' Favorite

What would make a normal, rational person throw away everything and everyone he holds dear? Meth VS Death: "No Way Out" by Stormy Rainey explores the true story of one man’s relationship with drugs. From the age of three when his brother dies in a car accident, to his first incarceration and beyond, this life story is gritty, brutally honest and sometimes uncomfortable to read. Discover the events that led a young boy to leave a promising future in Football College for a prison cell. Stormy is walking a dangerous path, but he doesn’t care, he will willingly risk losing the respect of family and friends to supply and take drugs. How does the mind of an addict rationalize their behaviour; what makes them sacrifice everything and care for nothing, including their mortality? This book will enlighten, educate and sometimes shock you, but the sad reality is this is a true story, not fiction.

The author has created an explosive opening to this book, from his jail cell, and this gripped my attention immediately. This is not a sensationalized story of his life, and Stormy has made no excuses for his behaviour or beliefs. He is brutal with the facts, and how he acted and treated people around him. I learned a great deal about the mindset of the drug taker and supplier. It triggered many emotions reading this account. He has managed to describe events so clearly that you can visualize them and the characters involved. When his brother, Brandon, left a promising football career to follow him, it was truly heartbreaking, as was the battle his mother fought to keep her family on the right side of the law. This is a crucial read for anyone dealing with addiction in the family.

Sarah Stuart

Meth VS Death: “No Way Out” is told in a conversational style by Stormy Rainey that makes it very easy to enter his life. First, briefly, his earliest childhood memories, but progressing rapidly to real trouble for him and his brother in their mid-teens. Cousin Mary is into drugs, and where she leads Stormy follows. Or he does until he builds a countrywide drug empire of his own, constantly dodging police out to get him, and all before he finished school. His personal “brief” is to show the eternal struggle between good and evil – God and the devil, if you will – and it is done with an honesty that draws a reader remorselessly on through the horrors of drug-taking and its effects on society today.

Stormy Rainey made me wonder, “There but for the grace of God go I.” According to many experts, 80% of the person we become depends on childhood experiences, and he had some that account for much, but not all. Meth VS Death: “No Way Out” is not for the easily offended or the squeamish; drug-taking affects every aspect of life. That includes sex, and addicted Stormy Rainey has no qualms about having sisters one after the other, treating girls roughly, or intensely descriptive detail concerning his poor health due to not eating or sleeping. Then there is Amber, druggie and mother of his son, Tommy, who grows up to deal in meth. Must the circle of life always be drugs, theft for money to buy more, and jail? Meth VS Death: “No Way Out” poses a powerful question.

Ruffina Oserio

Meth VS Death: No Way Out by Stormy Rainey is a focused and hugely inspiring autobiography. It’s raw and told in an utterly honest tone. This is the story of a man’s involvement in drugs and the fetters that held him in a low life, got him involved in crime and finally led him to a jail cell. One may ask: What does the story of an addict and drug dealer to do with anything? It’s more than that. It’s the story of his struggle with addiction, a tale of redemption, sprinkled with lessons and truths that can help any reader out there. In the opening chapter, the author states: “It’s an up and down roller coaster ride — my highs will leave that warm butterfly feeling in your stomach and my lows are the all-time lows that leave you sick and in disbelief.”

The author takes the reader through a childhood trauma, an accident in which he lost Mike, a brother. He was just three years old then. His mother divorced his biological father and Stormy lived with his adopted father, his mom’s new husband. By the time young Stormy neared his senior year in high school, he had earned a pretty good reputation as a drug dealer and the reputation went beyond school. From this moment, readers see a roller coaster life of drug dealing, moving from weed to cocaine. Follow him through the highs and lows of his life until the moment where he has to choose between meth and death, and is there any difference between the two?

The story is told in a very simple style and the honesty that comes across in the author’s voice is stunning. Stormy Rainey has a way of integrating family dynamics into the narrative that will get the reader’s attention. The author gives readers an inside look at what it takes to deal with drugs. The story also explores the psychology of addiction and offers a strong testimony of how it escalates until the user becomes helpless. Ultimately, this autobiography explains what it takes to lead a low life, but it’s the author’s journey towards redemption that will impress most readers. Meth VS Death: No Way Out is both inspiring and informative, a story that is ruthlessly honest, packed with insights and lessons for anyone battling an addiction.

Viga Boland

I’ve always believed truth is stranger than fiction. Likewise, truth is often harder to read and believe, often even more frightening than the best of thriller fiction. Meth vs Death “No Way Out” by Stormy Rainey (his real name) is true, hard to read and, yes, frightening…perhaps not so much to drug addicts (though it should be)…but to those readers who don’t have such addictions, or who perhaps have children whom they fear might be using pot, cocaine or meth. As youngsters, both Stormy and his brother, Brandon, had aspirations of playing football professionally in the future. But after Stormy got himself kicked off the local team, Brandon quit too. Now, two teenagers - with time on their hands and lots of anger in their hearts from years of their father’s abuse - became “good at being bad”. As so often happens, their drug involvement began in small, recreational ways and blew itself up into a way of life that lasted, at least for Stormy, over a decade. Over those years, Stormy graduated from recreational user to severe addiction, most of the time supporting himself, and eventually his wife and infant, through selling to friends. His final deterioration…and subsequent incarceration…was the result of manufacturing and distributing meth. As Rainey says at one point in the book: “I was living to die…living to get high…nothing more, nothing less,” and even the birth of his son wasn’t enough to make him stop his self and family-destroying habit.

When we meet Stormy, and where we leave him, is awaiting trial on a slew of charges likely to get him 8-15 years in jail. He has written Meth VS Death “No Way Out” in the hopes he might save at least one person from the agonies of the life he brought upon himself and his family. Quite honestly, I almost think his book should be required reading for both parents and teens. He has done a superb job of telling the ugly truth honestly. One can sense the regret he feels, not so much for being caught, but for wasting so many years of his young life and destroying the lives of others. Rainey’s observations on people, both friends and not, are often astute and worth readers’ time. And while the book may not be stylistically perfect, and relies heavily on narrative, the pace never slows down or becomes boring. You just find yourself constantly wishing Rainey could walk away from his addiction instead of digging bigger and deeper holes for himself. Let’s just hope his story will give others following a similar path a reason to reconsider hanging around with those who facilitate their habits…especially when they are still in their teens and still too young to consider the true consequences of their actions.

Larry Cox

This is a brutal look at the life of a drug addict from the beginning party stage to the surviving day to day for the next hit. It is heartbreakingly honest. It captivates you from the beginning. It should be required reading for those that think drugs are fun and harmless. The descent from the first high to hell is depicted in this book.

Amber

It’s a very good book and you can visualize the story as you read it. I recommend anyone with a drug addiction or know someone with one to read this. You can feel that the authors heart and emotions are in this book. It’s s great read, I couldn’t put it down.

VIGA BOLAND

I’ve always believed truth is stranger than fiction. Likewise truth is often harder to read and believe, often even more frightening that the best of thriller fiction. Meth vs Death “No Way Out” by Stormy Rainey (his real name) is true, hard to read and, yes, frightening…perhaps not so much to drug addicts (though it should be)…but to those readers who don’t have such addictions, or who perhaps have children whom they fear might be using pot, cocaine or meth.

As youngsters, both Stormy and his brother Brandon, had aspirations of playing football professionally in the future. But after Stormy got himself kicked off the local team, Brandon quit too. Now, two teenagers with time on their hands and lots of anger in their hearts from years of their father’s abuse, became “good at being bad”.

As too often happens, their drug involvement began in small, recreational way and blew itself up into a way of life, that lasted, at least for Stormy, over a decade. Over those years, Stormy graduated from recreational user, to severe addiction, most of the time supporting himself, and eventually his wife and infant, through selling to friends. His final deterioration…and subsequent incarceration…was the result of manufacturing and distributing meth. As Rainey says at one point in the book:

“I was living to die…living to get high…nothing more, nothing less,”

and even the birth of his son wasn’t enough to make him stop his self and family-destroying habit.

When we meet Stormy, and where we leave him, is awaiting trial on a slew of charges likely to get him 8-15years in jail. He has written Meth VS Death “No Way Out” in the hopes he might save at least one person from the agonies of the life he brought upon himself and his family. Quite honestly, I almost think his book should be required reading for both parents and teens. He has done a superb job of telling the ugly truth honestly. One can sense the regret he feels, not so much for being caught, but for wasting so many years of his young life and destroying the lives of others.

Rainey’s observations on people, both friends and not, are often astute and worth readers’ time. And while the book may not be stylistically perfect, and relies heavily on narrative, the pace never slows down or becomes boring. You just find yourself constantly wishing Rainey could walk away from his addiction instead of digging bigger and deeper holes for himself. Let’s just hope his story will give others following a similar path a reason to reconsider hanging around with those who facilitate their habits…especially when they are still in their teens and still too young to consider the true consequences of their actions.