Short of Love


Fiction - General
428 Pages
Reviewed on 08/04/2019
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    Book Review

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite

Short Of Love is a work of picaresque satirical fiction penned by author Martin Knox, which explores the notion of love and relationships, and how we treat other human beings when we view them as commodities for love rather than as individuals. The action of this conceptual and intriguing piece centres on the deeply selfish Tom Archer, a student with eyes on the prize for a future as a career man. When he meets Vicki Hillstone, however, Tom’s distraction and desire for a relationship with her set him on a collision course in a way he never thought possible. After their university days are marred by secrecy and short-sightedness, can they ever achieve real happiness together?

Author Martin Knox has created a fascinating parody of modern love and its effects on life, whilst also managing to stay true to the nature of many relationships where competition becomes a feature over compassion. The narrative style is intriguing and may not suit all readers, but Knox’s relationship with the reader is as intimate as the central character Tom wishes he could be with Vicki, in all its irony. At its heart, the aspect of vulnerability is both pathetic and comical, rooted in the same deceptions that we all play out in order to attract a mate and seem better than we are. The dialogue conveys this sharpness well and brings the characters to a new level beyond what the narrator reveals to us. Overall, Short Of Love will interest any reader who enjoys dissecting relationships and the notion of romance itself.