The Complicity Doctrine

The Complicity Doctrine


Fiction - Intrigue
286 Pages
Reviewed on 09/21/2012
Buy on Amazon

Author Biography

An active duty Naval Officer, ship driver by trade, Matthew M. Frick has lived overseas and traveled extensively throughout the Middle East and Europe. A prolific writer and author of several published articles and conference papers about the Middle East and maritime piracy, his writings have been referenced in journals, theses, and other media in over five different countries; including India, Russia, and Iran (translated into Farsi and located on the official Majlis website). A native of Stone Mountain, Georgia, he currently resides near Washington, D.C., with his wife, two children, and a blue tick hound.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Ellen Hogan for Readers' Favorite

Susan Williams receives a call from her friend Mari. Mari says she needs to see Susan because she thinks someone is trying to kill her. Susan asks her friend Casey Shenk to go with her. Also at the deli that morning is police officer Paul Giordano and his pregnant wife Emily. There is an explosion outside the deli. Paul's wife in injured and they lose their unborn son. Mari is also injured and dies in the hospital. Both Paul and Casey are astounded when the attack takes place. That and the attacks at the same time on St. Patrick's Cathedral and a Jewish Synagogue are said to have been carried out by Middle Eastern terrorists. Both Paul and Casey saw the bomber of the deli and he was an American. They decide there is some kind of cover up going on and set out to find who exactly ordered the death of Mari and the bombings. When Casey writes a post on his blog titled "The Complicity Doctrine", he is warned off the story by his boss and Paul is asked to back off as the the police have their answer. Neither one can and as the story develops Casey believes both of their lives are in danger.

This book grips us from the beginning and does not let us go till the end. Though some parts are pretty easy to predict, the author keeps surprises on the horizon with unexpected twists and turns. The story flows well throughout the book. There were no slow parts at all and it is full of high energy. All of the main characters are very well rounded and strong in their own right. They are supported by superb minor characters like Casey's boss Jim, and fellow co-worker Andie. There is a glimpse into the workings of a political campaign thrown in too. This book is an excellent read and I would highly recommend it.

Anne B.

After receiving a frantic call from her friend Mari, Susan Williams asked Casey to join them for breakfast. Mari gave Susan two memory sticks, explaining that someone was trying to killer her for the stored information. Casey noticed a man with a tattoo sweating profusely as he fumbled with a satchel; then the man hurriedly left. Casey realized what was about to happen and pushed Susan down. Glass rained down from the explosion that left Mari in a coma. There was a police officer in the deli along with his pregnant wife. Their unborn child did not survive the explosion. Three places were bombed, a Christian church, a Jewish Synagogue, and a small deli; it just did not add up. Terrorists rarely used rednecks. Senator Cogburn made a comment to the press throwing suspicion on al Houthi, Hizbullah and al Qa’ida. Was it possible that the bombing of the deli accomplished two tasks: killing Mari and blaming the Arabs? Was someone trying to start another war? Who and what is the Council?

"The Complicity Doctrine" by Matthew Frick is filled with conspiracy, intrigue, action, thrills and danger. Casey is a fascinating lead character with depth, humor and intelligence. I quickly chose who I thought was the most likely suspect. This plot is realistic and could have been ripped from the headlines. "The Complicity Doctrine" is an entertaining, intellectual political thriller sure to please the discriminating mystery fan. I was unfamiliar with author Matthew Frick but I will certainly be watching for more of his work.

Alice D.

Oscar Horstein, the lone Israeli analyst at American-based Intelligence Watch Group, knows that Iran is developing uranium at Natanz. The Iranian nuclear site was hurt cosmetically and was not destroyed when the Israelis bombed it. Casey Shenk, another IWG employee who is one to take risks, meets with IWG leader Jim Shelton to discuss the terrorist Tahrik-i-Taliban who they believe is partnering with the Iranian Baloch rebels. Meanwhile, Susan Williams is back from three weeks in Egypt and gets a cellphone message from her college roommate, Mariam Fahda. They agree to meet at a deli on East 40th Street in New York City. Casey is drawn to Susan and meets with her and Mariam at the deli. New York City Police officer Paul Giordano, assigned to the police department's Counter Terrorism Bureau, is also at that same deli with his pregnant wife. A bomb destroys the deli, killing Mari and Giordano's unborn son among many others. Bombs also implode at St. Patrick's Cathedral and Manhattan's Central Synagogue. But the bomber is an Appalachian "red neck" with a gang tattoo. Why does Senate Resolution 95 wants a terrorist off the bad guy list and what is this about Iran making drugs to obtain guns? And are Senator William Cogburn and his aide Joel Simpson really to be trusted?

"The Complicity Doctrine" is a thriller certain to delight readers everywhere with its twists and turns and bad guys turning up here and there. The mystery of what is going on is set up early in the story which makes for great reading. Casey Shenk, Susan Williams, Paul Giordano, as well as Senator Cogburn and Joel Simpson are well-conceived characters who add to the story's thriller element. That "The Complicity Doctrine" is based upon double-dealing and the idea of a powerful council that controls the world's economy suits our present times well. It is a great read for thriller lovers everywhere.