The Eagle and the Child

The Eagle and the Child

The Child (Volume 1)

Fiction - Religious Theme
644 Pages
Reviewed on 10/07/2017
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

S. Khubiar is a retired federal law enforcement officer. The author enjoys using fiction to explore multilayered themes drawn from work experience, religious observance, and the existential challenges to Persian immigrants in both America and Israel.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Susan Sewell for Readers' Favorite

Espionage, religion, and love collide in the thrilling novel, The Eagle and the Child) The Child Trilogy Book 1 by S. Khubiar. Dr. Phillip Sherrod is an up and coming orthopedic surgeon, with a reputation for his indiscretions. After a year of treating the enigmatic Dr. Shahla Markow for a shoulder injury, he discovers there is far more to her than her government job with the Federal Bureau of Prisons and he is intrigued. When Shahla is stabbed by a prisoner and requests Phillip as her surgeon, his interest takes a more serious turn. Her government job has another layer, and he realizes Shahla is a trained killer; still, her paradoxical life fascinates Phillip even more. He finally convinces her to marry him, but the complexity of their relationship intensifies when Phillip learns she practices and follows the laws of Judaism. Because he loves her, Phillip endeavors to understand and incorporate Shahla's religion into his life, yet the incongruity between her beliefs and her work continues to perplex him. Shahla's history is still a mystery to him, and one evening when she has visitors from her past who attempt to intimidate him, Phillip becomes very upset. Shahla won't explain their presence, and Phillip loses control; he oversteps his moral and physical boundaries. Two days later, without explanation, Shahla disappears. Has he driven Shahla away or has Shahla's past caught up with her?

The Eagle and the Child by S. Khubiar is a scintillating tale about a woman operative's struggles to have an ordinary life, despite her race, religion, and career. In combining Shahla's and Phillip's dissimilar cultures, the story realistically portrays the extreme difficulties existing in combining two diverse backgrounds. Shahla views her place in her home and society in the traditions of her Persian parents, which vary significantly in contrast to Phillip's Protestant upbringing. The polarity of their formative years brings an element of intensity to the plot and an unexpected development in the storyline. This is an enlightening story confronting the issues of hate and prejudice from the viewpoint of those who are the victims of intolerance. Intrigue and subterfuge are the principal elements woven throughout the book, laced with fast-paced action and electrifying fight scenes. These exciting aspects keep the reader mesmerized and entertained until the final page. It is a suspenseful story centered around international government conflicts and building to an exhilarating climax. This riveting novel terminates on an emotional cliffhanger, leaving the reader anxiously awaiting the sequel. This is a brilliant beginning to a saga that reminds me of a modern version of the "Zion Chronicles" by Brock and Bodie Thoene. Discretion is advised as there are bouts of violence, mild sex scenes, and a few mature words.

Christian Sia

The Eagle and the Child by S. Khubiar is a stunning opening in The Child trilogy, featuring espionage at its best, a story that combines elements of a hard-core political thriller with intense action to take readers on a rollercoaster ride. Emotionally strong and psychologically intense, this novel is a work of great entertainment.

As a spy for the Israeli government, Shahla finds it easy to disguise herself as a Research Specialist in a Federal prison. When it is time to abandon her obligations to the two governments, she finds herself trapped. Perhaps she’d enjoyed some form of freedom working as a spy than leaving her double standard life at the service of two governments. Her decision to get married could have helped her heal, but at a Passover celebration things go awry as intelligence from three different countries converge. But one man is out for revenge and Shahla finds herself in the field of battle.

This well-crafted thriller had me hooked from the very beginning and the author does an impeccable job with character and plot. There is no way the reader can’t root for the characters. The position of the protagonist is very delicate and the reader can’t help but feel for her. There is a great sense of pacing and the plot is filled with intricacies that draw readers into its occasional darkness and then throw them back to the crude reality of what it is like to be a spy. S. Khubiar’s writing is measured and very accessible to readers. The Eagle and the Child is a gripping story that grabs the reader instantly by the throat and only gives some respite at its satisfying conclusion.

Arya Fomonyuy

The Eagle and the Child is the first book in The Child trilogy by S. Khubiar; well-imagined and flawlessly executed, a book with strong religious and political themes — religious extremism, espionage, anti-Semitism, domestic violence, and loyalty. Meet Shahla, a woman torn between two worlds. She is an American working as a Research Specialist in a Federal prison, but she is also disguised as a spy for the Israeli government. She wants nothing more than to be free of the two governments, and a mixed marriage with a man she'd hoped would help bring light to her world becomes the source of a new nightmare. During a Passover celebration, she finds herself compelled to face a past she’d have loved to bury, with intelligence agents from three different countries and someone who is out to settle scores. Can her skills save her and protect her marriage?

This is a great read, a story that explores mixed cultures and I enjoyed the way the author talks about the complexities of a marriage between a Jewish and a Gentile. S. Khubiar has a unique gift for the storytelling craft, witty and intelligent dialogues, and character development. I started enjoying the beauty of the language and the depth of the dialogues from the very first page. There are expressions that are just so insightful and lovely. The conflict is multilayered and beautifully developed to move the story forward. The characters have depth and readers will enjoy Phillip and Shahla, the tension between them, and the incredible journey they take through the entire story. The Eagle and the Child features stellar writing, a gripping story, and memorable characters. It opens a whole new world for readers to navigate. A delightful read, indeed!