The Girl Who Loved Pots

The Girl Who Loved Pots


Children - Grade K-3rd
32 Pages
Reviewed on 07/23/2017
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Author Biography

Growing up in Virginia, Rosilyn Seay had two major influences, a strong supportive family and a love for reading. She began creating her own stories at the age of twelve. She earned a degree in Mathematics from Lincoln University, married, raised a family of her own, and had a successful professional career in Computer Science and IT Solutions. She uses those IT skills to illustrate the stories in her books. Her stories reflect her strong belief in family. They are entertaining tales about real kids in real life situations that young people universally can relate to.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Rosie Malezer for Readers' Favorite

The Girl Who Loved Pots is a delightfully imaginative children’s book, written and illustrated by Rosilyn Seay. May is a young girl who loves to pretend. Like most little girls, May loves tea parties with her dolls and toys, as well as having long talks and laughter with her mother, making her feel quite grown up. But her favorite way to have fun is by putting pots to good use by using them as small tables, drums, hats, and anything else her imagination could produce. When new babysitter, Miss Josephine, arrives with a mysterious Smart Bag in tow, however, May quickly discovers a whole new world of adventure, fun and friendship, and that there is a hidden child within all of us.

Rosilyn Seay’s exciting tale of a child who loves to use pots as props as she plays is a wonderfully-written story which quickly put a smile on my face. Nothing is stronger than the imaginative playtime of children, and when they improvise with pots to entertain themselves, their laughter and smiles are the best reward. Much of the story took me back to my own childhood, where children were given quite the amount of freedom, as long as they were not causing harm or damage to any person, animal or property in the neighborhood. Seeing a child have such an incredible amount of fun – without a computer game or tablet in their hands – makes me envious and excited for those children, as they get to enjoy a happy and carefree childhood, just as all children should. I fully enjoyed The Girl Who Loved Pots and look forward to Rosilyn Seay’s next book. I recommend The Girl Who Loved Pots to all young children (and their parents), so they can see that using your imagination and putting it to good use is the best fun any child can have.