The Little Bastards

The Little Bastards


Fiction - Realistic
288 Pages
Reviewed on 02/22/2014
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (Goodreads, B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Donation Program, which was created to help nonprofit and charitable organizations (schools, libraries, convalescent homes, soldier donation programs, etc.) by providing them with free books and to help authors garner more exposure for their work. This author is willing to donate free copies of their book in exchange for reviews (if circumstances allow) and the knowledge that their book is being read and enjoyed. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email. Be sure to tell the author who you are, what organization you are with, how many books you need, how they will be used, and the number of reviews, if any, you would be able to provide.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Jack Magnus for Readers' Favorite

The Little Bastards is a coming of age novel written by Jim Lindsay. It's set in Willamette, a small town in Oregon, during the 1950s. The reader first encounters the narrator, Sonny Mitchell, when he's just turned fourteen and it's late summer. He and his pal, Joe, race off to a railroad trestle to see the train crash that has left one person dead and several others injured. Joe and Sonny are the youngest members of the group they hang out with and are the only ones who've never seen a dead body. They race madly through town, only to catch a mere glimpse of the ambulances and a sobering view of the catastrophe. Their group is known as the Little Bastards, a name originally bestowed on them by the lumber yard watchman whose life they've made miserable, that they adopted as a badge of honor and identity.

Jim Lindsay's coming of age story is richly evocative of the life and times of small-town kids during the 1950s. I quickly was immersed in Sonny's tale as he and his friends graduate from frantic bike rides around town while reading all about hot rods to actually working on and riding in their own, while listening all the while to the latest rock and roll music on the radio. The descriptions of the environment, the cool foggy days of western Oregon and the clubhouse hidden in blackberry thickets where the kids hang out, smoking cigarettes and listening to 45s are fabulous. Equally fascinating is the way Lindsay's narrator walks the reader through the intricacies of modifying cars and conveys the excitement of the drag races held on Otto's farm and the formalities of challenging racers. Add in the local high school girls who are just starting to appreciate these kids from the wrong side of town, and you've got the combination for a great story -- and it rides beautifully.