Datapocalypse


Fiction - Science Fiction
296 Pages
Reviewed on 01/23/2020
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Part engineer, part musician, part poet, a focused writer; Christopher Keast spends his early waking hours creating stories and ideas in an attempt to awaken and entertain. His stories focus on non-spiritual enlightenment (or spiritual-if you prefer) and collectively progressing our actions as humans – rulers of planet Earth, destined to rule others as well – in a diligent and responsible way. Not to say his stories are always serious. Comedy and irony play big roles in what drives his writing. Conversely, so do dystopian analogies. Enjoy the ride!

About Datapocalypse:
In the not-so-distant future, as the world’s digital freight-train rolls right into its inevitable threshold of physical data storage limits, strange things begin to happen. At the same time, Kicis and Anna are each at a philosophical crossroads. The two of them collide under most inauspicious circumstances: things begin to disappear. As they try to find the meaning and reasons behind it—helping others to avert disaster—as though trying to solve the final riddle plaguing humanity, has a tipping point been reached in the bounds of Earth’s physical constraints? Or is it simply the beginning of the Datapocalypse?

A novel on the throes of artificial intelligence creeping a little too much into our lives along with the continuous feeding of our picture-taking appetites. Datapocalypse is a poetic attempt to bring together science-fiction, international-intrigue, comedy, romance and dystopia in articulation of a fierce exaggeration of our destiny.

See book trailer (links below) for story behind the Datapocalypse story...

    Book Review

Reviewed by Charles Remington for Readers' Favorite

Datapocalypse introduces Dr. Kicis Ryan Orion, who lectures in History at Berkeley, specializing in the demise or erosion of civilizations. While on a trip around the ancient sites of the Mediterranean to gather material for a paper he is producing, he becomes intrigued by an idea that arises from a boozy conversation in a Greek island taverna. With the huge number of photos and films being taken on mobile devices and uploaded to social media, when will the ‘cloud’ run out of space? Would we need to start deleting the burgeoning mass of data, and what would be the result of society losing their precious photo memories? Unbeknown to him though, steps in this direction are already in progress. But when the autonomous Artificial Intelligence tasked with the project starts to run out of control, strange things begin to happen, and when the Colosseum in Rome disappears into thin air, fear and confusion reign - air transport is grounded and governments go into lock-down. Kicis is convinced that the data overload and the strange events which continue to happen are somehow linked.

Datapocalypse by Christopher Keast delves into an intriguing idea. When will we run out of data storage space? Nothing in the world is infinite so this must happen at some point. What will the indicators be that signal when we are reaching saturation point? Mr. Keast has taken this fascinating subject and produced a novel which is part science fiction, part dystopia, part love story, and part conspiracy thriller. Personally, I found that, though absorbing, the narrative jarred at times and the plot was a little stretched in places. A certain amount of artistic license is required, but the concept was interesting enough to keep me reading to the end. A unique and interesting addition to the sci-fi genre.