Part of the Family

Christadelphians, the Kindertransport, and Rescue from the Holocaust

Non-Fiction - Historical
426 Pages
Reviewed on 04/09/2017
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Author Biography

Jason Hensley, M.A.Ed, is the principal of a small private school in California. At school, he teaches religious studies and a senior-level course on Christianity and the Holocaust. The material for this book has served as the backbone for the curriculum in the latter course. He frequently lectures on this and related topics throughout North America.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers' Favorite

Part of the Family: Christadelphians, the Kindertransport, and Rescue from the Holocaust, Volume 1 by Jason Hensley is an ongoing project by the author, an attempt to catalog the lives and experiences of the Jewish refugees who were sheltered by Christadelphians during the 1930s and 1940s. This book gives readers an intrinsic introduction to this small Christian sect and how they responded to WWII, particularly the Holocaust, before moving to the personal experiences of the interviewed Jewish refugees.

Part of the Family is a commendable, well-documented work from Hensley that shows the great effort that he put into his research. It gives an insight into another part of the Holocaust history that I had little knowledge of. The clear cut prose makes the reading easy, informative and touching, especially when each refugee shared both their happy and painful memories in trying to adapt to a new country, culture and language. The story of Rella Adler is the last entry for the refugees’ experiences, as she recalls her reluctance to leave the Christadelphian family that she grew to love before going to the United States to live with her biological aunt. The pictures help readers to see back in time and put faces to names of those that Hensley interviewed, giving a sense of familiarity of how the lives of those refugees turn out in the end. On the whole, this is a great read and I wish Hensley the best for this ongoing collaborative project between him, the interviewees, and their family, as well as the Christadelphian families who housed them. I hope more stories that have never been told before can be discovered and shared with the world.