The Flute Player


Poetry - General
120 Pages
Reviewed on 09/08/2016
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Raminder Bajwa works as a computer engineer; he also holds a degree in chemical engineering. When he was young, he received the Gold Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. He also enjoyed practicing karate, mountaineering, horseback riding, rifle-shooting, athletics, and debate.

A resident of Mercer County, New Jersey, Raminder lives with his pet—a Husky named Ralph. Bajwa has published three books of poems. His previous poetry collections, Of Angels and Few Lies, of Everything under Blue Skies and Enlightenment, are available through Amazon.com.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Emily-Jane Hills Orford for Readers' Favorite

Music, poetry and life – can there be one without the other? Love and faith are universal elements of humanity, even if humans have different forms of love and faith, different beliefs. One thing that unites us all is music and poetry. It defines us, consoles us, refreshes us, and it makes us understand what even the greatest politicians or orators of our times cannot do. “They say life is hard, be able to bend like a feather/ But don’t you worry – the divine flute! Holds the strings of the Universe together.” Music and poetry are the heartbeat and breathing essence of life.

Raminder Bajwa’s collection of poems, The Flute Player, strives to bring the complex world of the twenty-first century into context. The book is divided into four sections: Of Love, Observations, Wishes, and Attitude. Each section contains short, concise poems that reflect the power of music and poetry in life. Coupled with colorful photographs, the poems evoke emotions using metaphors, particularly musical metaphors, of significant depth. The poet strives to present an understanding that all in life is equal and not one of us is better or more important than the other. We are all linked together, regardless of our beliefs and our politics; we are linked together through poetry and music.

“It takes a small musician to understand the Big One’s musical notes./ It takes love, not hate! To bring joy, take it for free,/ Don’t search for the flute player! He’s within you and me.”

This is a powerful and insightful collection of poems, one that needs to be studied over and over again.

Charles Remington

The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa is a beautiful book in several ways. It is attractive to look at, the cover image is perfect, and most of the poems are accompanied by high quality images that serve to enhance the poet’s words. The way in which the poems have been divided is a pertinent reflection on how most of us would rank the important things in life - love comes first, which is as it should be. The poems are broad in scope, looking outwards as well as in; there are poignant words on love and loss, but also distressed words on tragic world events. The poem ‘My Resignation’ for instance, rails at God after the terrorist outrages in France, asking ‘Are we in your image?’ A pertinent question if we are to believe in the promise of the Christian Bible.

All the poems are written in simple accessible language, lacking the arch juxtapositions and forced metaphors that sometimes make this genre so confusing. A few more words from the book further illustrate my point; they are the last lines of ‘Life is Beautiful’: Footprints you leave on Life’s vast sand, Life, it’s beautiful! Yes, life, it’s grand.

I found the Flute Player an uplifting and optimistic book - a difficult feat to pull off when the poet is dealing with the death of soldiers defending their country, terrorist atrocities, the mistrust of the police, and the seeming indifference of God. Somehow Raminder Bajwa has managed to retain his positive outlook. His faith, trust, and humanity shine through his work. Congratulations to him on a fine poetic work.

Vernita Naylor

The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa is a beautiful collection of poems that includes love, being young, and our fallen heroes. The poems are broken up into sections: Of Love, Observations, Wishes and Attitudes. Within each section not only are these poems personal and passionate about the titled subject matter, but The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa is different. As Bajwa expresses emotions throughout each poem, there are beautiful pictures representing most of the poems, courtesy of various photographers. The poems accompanied by pictures give a special touch. In The Flute Player you will find that there are poems for everyone, from Las Vegas and children to having a special crush.

I became intrigued by The Flute Player. As I navigated through each page of the book, it just opened up and presented a life of its own. The photos helped to give The Flute Player a presence. Just as on social media, it states that if your articles are accompanied by a photo, the likelihood of being viewed is greater. We are visual people. I have some favorites such as Which Side Are You On?, Life? Enough, Strings of Your Soul, and Salute due to the messaging displayed within each poem and, of course, the photos. The colorful pictures with my favorite poems just helped me to envisage more of what the poem was relaying. If you want a different poetic experience, I suggest that you get a copy of The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa.

Ruffina Oserio

The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa is a short, yet beautiful collection of poems covering a diversity of topics. The title is very symbolic, suggestive of joy, alacrity, and the spirit of celebration. In the very short preface, the author announces what the reader will find in these simple yet revealing and profound poems: “To make you daydream once again! / In these times tragic, / So the flute player once again picks up his flute / And weaves his very magic.” Yes, Bajwa writes about universal themes and focuses on capturing moments, feelings, and thoughts that allow the rhymes and rhythmic poems to resonate with readers of diverse cultures and creeds.

Just like in his previous poetry collection, Bajwa offers a simple structure for The Flute Player, grouping the poems into four sections: love, observations, wishes, and attitudes. Each poem is accompanied by a telling image, an arresting picture that expresses the core message in the poem. The voice is jovial and exuberant, at times inundated with a powerful emotion of love. “To Kill a Poet” is a breathless expression of a heart crying for love. “I beg to her, as she winks, / Please take me under your soft wings. / Teach me passion, get me high…” Then some of the poems are so short and beautiful they come across like little pearls, a pendant to hold onto. But Bajwa doesn’t just write about love; his poetic gaze moves from the profane happenings around him to the mysteries of the Divine.

These are poems that can be read straight in one sitting, well-written, flowing with the intensity of life. Some of them are so beautiful, like “The Heart of a Poet,” and it is interesting to observe how the poet allows his humanity and spirituality to come through each poem. The Flute Player is a collection that should be offered as a gift to friends and loved ones. Some of the stanzas can read wonderfully on greeting cards and markers. A unique collection of poems.

Romuald Dzemo

The Flute Player by Raminder Bajwa is a wonderful poetry collection that features many themes. The volatile nature of love, “not for the faint of heart,” comes across powerfully in some of the poems. The poet’s awe and communion with the Sacred is also portrayed powerfully in some poems. Then there is life as we all know it, with its thrills and manifold aches.

With his flute, the poet celebrates love, life, faith, brotherhood, passion, and many things in between. In his poetic gaze, he loses nothing, capturing emotions and feelings that are common to many people, but he does so in a very unique and conversational style. The Flute Player is a slim collection, but it is rich in style and imagery. Some of the poems follow a fairly regular rhythm and the rhyming adds a musical dimension to the poems. Of course, the poems sing to the ears like a "piper" with deft hands on the flute.

I was drawn in by the exquisitely beautiful cover with the eloquent image of a boy playing a flute, but I wasn’t disappointed when I opened the book. The poems are grouped into four different parts and each poem has a symbolic image published beside it. The short lines like in “A Salute,” that celebrates heroism, also hasten the rhythm. I loved the rhymes. I loved the witticism in some poems. I loved the humor. I loved the realism that stares the reader in the face as though asking: “Would you deny that you ever had this same feeling too?” Raminder Bajwa has the gift of gathering powerful and subtle emotions into beautiful lines of poetry. This is another gift to poetry fans, believers, lovers, and the ordinary person looking for the light through the stark darkness of life. It’s a delightful read.