Truth, Lies and Propaganda in Africa

Truth, Lies and Propaganda Book 1

Non-Fiction - Occupational
253 Pages
Reviewed on 02/05/2017
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Author Biography

Abandoned in the African bush with a 9 week old baby and no resources Lucinda could look back on a childhood of mental abuse, without knowing that before her lay an even more bizarre future. She would run the worst riding school in the world, broadcast live with a bayonet at her throat, be fired from her teaching position and thrown into the media world. She would learn how to lie in the name of propaganda, write about dozens of topics for a variety of clients and have her own newspaper column. She would meet kings and statesmen, international artists and rural Africans. She would win several awards along the way for her scripting and films. Eventually she would reluctantly leave Africa to retire in Spain. A few months later she would begin writing books – seven to date in a variety of genres – and start a whole new career.
Back in Europe Lucinda met many people who knew little about Africa except for what they had seen in the media. And so, the Amie stories were born, to paint a true picture of the peoples and culture on the Dark continent wrapped up in a thrilling series of adventures which reflect her love for the lands she unwillingly left behind.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Mamta Madhavan for Readers' Favorite

Truth, Lies & Propaganda in Africa (Truth, Lies and Propaganda Book 1) by Lucinda E. Clarke is an engaging and powerful memoir that takes readers on a journey from that of a primary school teacher, to announcing on the radio, to scriptwriting for radio and television, and then branching out into the world of video production. The author focuses more on her stint with the SABC, and she gives readers a peek of what it is like to work on radio and television, with humor and wit, and reveals that it is not at all glamorous to work behind the scenes if you are in the media. For all those who want to know what goes on behind the camera, this memoir is a good read and also explains how programmes are put together.

The book is interesting and readers get an insight on what it was like to be an expatriate and live in apartheid South Africa. The author chronicles many funny incidents she has experienced while working with the media and she speaks about them extensively. The book also throws light on the political world and gives a inside look into the author’s entertaining experiences and adventures. I found the author’s experiences challenging and she captures the attention of readers with her excellent style of writing and good narration. The memoir is an eye-opener for readers who are caught up with the glamour of radio and television, and many times the author’s frustrations and difficulties are palpable while one is reading.