Uprooted

Family Trauma, Unknown Origins, and the Secretive History of Artificial Insemination

Non-Fiction - Social Issues
288 Pages
Reviewed on 06/30/2021
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Author Biography

Peter J. Boni credits his disruptive childhood, a state college education from UMass@Amherst, decorated on-the-ground service as a US Army Special Operations Team Leader in Vietnam (coined his “Rice Paddy MBA”), love of his family and friendship circle, plus luck-of-the-draw DNA with making him the person he has become today.

During his accomplished business career (high-tech CEO, venture capitalist, board chairman, award-winning entrepreneur), Peter has applied “lessons of leadership through adversity” from his life-altering experiences—themes found throughout his first book, All Hands on Deck: Navigating Your Team Through Crises, Getting Your Organization Unstuck, and Emerging Victorious. (Career Press, 2015).

An inspiring public speaker with a storytelling, audience-participation style, Peter enjoys an active physical regimen, entertaining and sailing with friends and family while at his Cape Cod residence and traveling with his wife to, among other locales, San Francisco and New York City to visit their growing family.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

In his middle years, Peter J. Boni is at the top of his professional career as a veteran high-tech CEO who is the go-to guy for organizations in disrepair. While his career has been competing for time and attention with his family, his mother suffers a post-surgical stroke. His wife then reveals to him that his mother, while regaining her memory, tells his wife a story that Peter’s father is not his biological parent. This is the story of Uprooted: Family Trauma, Unknown Origins, and the Secretive History of Artificial Insemination, where author Peter J. Boni traces the roots of his genealogical origin that took him twenty years. With the help of Tracy, his resilient and creative daughter, he comes to learn of the consequences of assisted reproduction as a long-lost sister, Roxy, enters the scene. As Roxy adds a few missing pieces to complete their genetic puzzle, Peter wonders if he has more half-siblings from a single sperm donor.

Uprooted is a passionate telling of a secret that was intended to be taken to the grave. I cannot help but admire Boni’s precise choice of words to aptly describe his feelings about the whole revelation and the moving narrative about his crusade to decode his genetic identity. This is a story that not only provides a startling look at reproductive technologies but similarly serves as a wake-up call for an industry practice that no one talks about. The most thought-provoking part of his journey is knowing that he is not alone as donor-conceived individuals continue to flourish. In discovering his own truth that has set him free, I strongly recommend that you read this work to encourage you to trace your own roots. Whether or not you are a product of a natural union, there is something liberating about knowing who you are at a genetic level.