One Family: Indivisible

A Spiritual Memoir

Non-Fiction - Religion/Philosophy
260 Pages
Reviewed on 10/18/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Kimberlee J Benart for Readers' Favorite

One Family: Indivisible: A Spiritual Memoir by Steven Greenebaum follows the lifelong journey of a man born into a Jewish family who became an Interfaith minister while still walking the path of Judaism. In an engaging account of the events, people, challenges, and tragedies that impacted his life from early childhood to his later years, Reverend Greenebaum provides the reader with a frank, detailed, and utterly relatable memoir. We see the role that family, education, music, friendships, romance, personal triumphs, tragedies, political forces, and events had on his outlook and understanding of the world and the activism they engendered in him. It was a path with unexpected zigs and zags on the one hand and spiritual confirmations on the other.

I enjoyed reading One Family: Indivisible. Reverend Greenebaum’s reflection on his life and how he came to view Interfaith as a “faith” and not just a platform for dialog is full of frank observations and personal experiences along the way. These touch on family, politics, democracy, racism, and activism. He describes five spiritually transformative events in his life, two of which occurred in childhood, two of which were the deaths of loved ones, and a fifth which had me muttering “Wow!” as I read it. Whether your own beliefs allow worshipping with people of different faiths or not, and whether you can accept humanity as one indivisible family or not, Reverend Steven Greenebaum skillfully makes the case that Interfaith can help us heal from the social, racial, and religious divisions that have beset us throughout our history. Highly recommended.