Where Do You Go?


Children - Grade K-3rd
38 Pages
Reviewed on 11/15/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Marie-Hélène Fasquel for Readers' Favorite

Where Do You Go? written by Laura Larson, and illustrated by Duli Sen, is a lovely children’s book about the need to escape it all, to go somewhere peaceful and feel better about oneself and the world. It is beautifully illustrated and the drawings perfectly complement the superb text. Eventually, both the author and the illustrator answer the question themselves, which is very moving. At the end of the book too, kids are given the opportunity to draw their own safe and quiet place(s).

Where Do You Go? by Laura Larson is one of my favorite children’s books (among all those I have read lately) as it is about what makes children’s lives hard; difficult times such as the COVID lockdown in the past, being ready for a test and being stressed out about it, being sick and worried, missing one’s loved ones. It offers a powerful way to feel better and to be independent. Indeed, this enchanting book allows young people (and older, for that matter) to dream in varied pretty places where they can relax. Imagining being in those places is a way of meditating and being closer to oneself while being more secure inside, calmer, and happier.

Our children, grandchildren, and students deserve to be more joyful in a world that is not always reassuring and mostly in crisis. Young minds have to face major actual and future threats, too often in addition to a feeling of helplessness, even despair. This adorable book is a means to tell them that one good way to cope is to find shelter within themselves, thanks to the unlimited power of imagination. This will contribute to raising the general level of good vibrations and hope. Keeping one's spirits high will help everybody in the long run!

Edith Wairimu

Where Do You Go? by Laura Larson is a delightful children’s book with helpful suggestions for how to create moments of peace in a loud, uncertain, and chaotic world. Every day, we are constantly bombarded by information, personal concerns, and a range of questions. We wish we could escape to a still and beautiful place and forget our worries. Larson shows that it is possible to create such places through the power of our minds. She poses the question, “Where do you go?” in such instances. For some, imagining themselves on a beach, hearing the sound of the waves, and enjoying the sun will provide a safe, peaceful place for their mind to rest. Through the power of our imagination, we can create similar places that allow us to slow down in our busy world.

Where Do You Go? by Laura Larson is enriched by vibrant illustrations that helped me visualize the places suggested in the story. There are colorful images of beautiful flowers, lush forests, and other peaceful landscapes. I loved that the story promotes a technique for finding calmness that is accessible to anyone and that can be utilized by both children and adults. All it takes is to use imagination to create that peaceful place that brings peace. The story’s lines employ rhyming words that create rhythm. Children will love reading through the musical lines. On every page, the story repeats its main question which will help ignite imagination. A fun activity that children will love to try is also included at the end. Where Do You Go? suggests an easy, helpful technique for finding peace and controlling emotions.

Natalie Soine

Laura Larson writes the most delightful children’s book which asks the question: “Where do you go when the world sounds abuzz and your mind is a flurry with all of the fuzz?” Where Do You Go? is filled with rhymes and beautiful pictures that encourage children (and adults) to give some thought to where their imagination takes them when their minds are filled with questions, worries, and fears. We all struggle with emotional chaos from time to time and this little book helps us to think of things other than that which is troubling us. An excellent tool for calming our brains and emotions.

When the world around us is scary and confusing, it can cause emotional and bodily stress, which can manifest itself in mental and physical discomfort or even illness. Laura Larson has found a way to help us find a calming place in the comfort of our own homes, using our powerful minds. We all strive for peace but have different ideas of what would bring peace and harmony to our minds. Where Do You Go? is really helpful for both children and adults who need a special place to escape to for a “brain holiday”. Try to imagine the place that brings you the most joy, a place without noise, problems, or troubling questions. It is vital that children find a calm place where they can soothe their souls and balance their thoughts. An absolute pleasure to read, I recommend this storybook for children, teenagers, and adults as a coping mechanism for stress.